Heraldic Titles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance: Dictionary of Period Forms

by Julia Smith

© 2008-2011 by Julia Smith. All rights reserved.
Version 2.6, updated 12 March 2011


This dictionary gives a brief discussion of the history of each heraldic title and dated forms, where they could be located. Additional forms that seem likely to be pre-1600 in form but are not more clearly dated are included in the text in italics. The language noted is the language of the document in which the name was recorded. For Latin, the language context from which that Latin was produced is also noted, as terminology (especially the terms used for pursuivants) are radically different in the Latin produced by Scots-speakers from the Latin produced by German-speakers, for example.

If you have any additional information about these heraldic titles and their use, please contact me at julias@alumni.pitt.edu. I'm particularly interested in other citations of these titles (and other titles) that demonstrate some point that isn't illustrated here: different spellings, different usages for how heralds were described and addressed, or usage in different languages than those illustrated here.


 
A ma vie Pursuivant - This French title is derived from the motto of the Order of the Ermine, meaning "with my life" (I will defend it). He was in service to the dukes of Brittany in the fifteenth century, according to Jones.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Amaulvi1425-7FrenchJones Revue
A ma vie1450-7FrenchJones
 

 
Abril Pursuivant - This French title is probably derived from the name of the month, although other names from this pattern are not documented. He served the count of Turenene, according to Navarrese records.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Abril1415French or SpanishNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Agincourt King of Arms - This English title is locative in origin, presumably to mark the important English victory at Agincourt. Franklyn & Tanner say that this title was "created by K. Hen. V but apparently complimentary only." Godfrey indicates that this was created after 1415, and the last reference to the title was in 1419.
 

 
Ainsi le vueil Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a motto, meaning "thus the will." He served the heir of the Duke of Brittany in 1431, according to Jones.
 

 
Albany Herald (French) - This French title is locative; it may actually be the same person as the Scottish herald above. He served the "monseigneur de Hollande" in 1407, according to Schnerb.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Albanye1407FrenchSchnerb
 

 
Albany Herald (Scottish) - This Scottish title is locative in origin; it is derived from the ducal title often granted to sons of the Scottish monarch. The title appears in the early fifteenth century and continues in use to the present day.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Albany le pursevant1448ScotsDSL s.n. Signifer(e)
Albany le pursevaunte1449ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Albany le poursuivant1450ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Albany herraldo1452Scots (or Latin in Scots context)DSL s.n. Albany
Albany herold1516ScotsDSL s.n. Albany
Albany herauld1565ScotsDSL s.n. Albany
Albany signifero Regis1451Latin (Scots)DSL s.n. Signifer(e)
Albanie ... heraldis1567Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
 

 
Alençon Herald - This French title is locative in origin, presumably derived from the counts and dukes of Alençon. It appears as Alançon in Friar, and as Alençon in George. The title continued in use until at least 1635, according to Guizot.
 

 
Algarve King of Arms - This Portuguese title is locative in origin; the Algarve was a semi-autonomous part of southern Portugal. Farinha Franco says that this king of arms controlled southern Portugal and north Africa in the late sixteenth century.
 

 
Alishay Pursuivant - This Scottish title is of unknown origin. Wagner and London argue that this title is a variant of Islay, but it is unclear whether this is true. It is also spelled Aliszai in Fox-Davies.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Alisza (maybe Aliszai)c. 1426English or ScotsFranklyn & Tanner
Alishay persewande1427ScotsDSL s.n. pursuivant
 

 
Alsace Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the region. It was fought over by France and the Holy Roman Empire, only coming under complete French control well after 1600. George dates it to before 1600.
 

 
Angeleme Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the county of Angoulême. From shortly after 1300, it was a title granted by the Crown of France, generally to close relatives, according to Adam Even.
 

 
Angus Pursuivant - This Scottish title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "a name of office formerly employed in Scotland." Wagner and London indicate that this herald belonged to the Earl of Angus and that the title was used from 1490 to 1513.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Angus herald1491ScotsDSL s.n. Angus [1]
 

 
Anjou King of Arms - This French title was locative in type, referring to a duchy of France. It appears before 1406, when the existing French kings of arms sign a petition to the king. This herald served the dukes of Anjou (including René le Bon).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Roy d'Anjou1406FrenchWagner H&H
Calabre, roy d'armes d'Anjou1407FrenchWagner HoE
 

 
Anjou King of Arms - This English title is locative in origin, and refers to an English sometime possession. Franklyn & Tanner say this was "an officer of arms maintained by the Duke of Bedford [John of Lancaster] before 1436." Godfrey gives dates from 1425 to 1436 for this officer. Anjou was a possession of the English crown at various points in time, and the Plantagenet house was also known as the House of Anjou. The French heraldic title is older and longer-lived.
 

 
Annel Pursuivant - This French title is probably locative in origin, from the modern location of Longueil-Annel. He was at the Congress of Arras in 1435, according to Contamine.
 

 
Antelope Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge. Franklyn & Tanner say that this was "an obs[olete] English name of office; from the badge (q.v.) of Bohun (c. 1419)." Godfrey indicates this title was created by Henry IV; his mother was a Bohun daughter. The Middle English Dictionary gives Antilope, Antelop, antlop, and probably Antelope as period spellings for the heraldic beast from which the title is derived.
 

 
Anthune Pursuivant - This French title is locative in nature, from a noble title. Nicholas Rolin, the chancellor of the duke of Burgundy from 1422 to 1462, was seigneur d'Anthune (modern Autun). This pursuivant may have served him.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Anthune le poursievant1451FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Aquitaine King of Arms - This English title is locative in origin; the English kings were also dukes of Aquitaine. Franklyn & Tanner say that this was "an XIV cent. office for service in the English territory of France."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Aquitaine1370FrenchAdam Even
Le roy Aquitaigne heraud1395FrenchWagner H&H
Roy d'armes d'Acquitainec. 1387EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Aragon King of Arms - This Spanish title is locative in origin; it is derived from the name of the kingdom (which continued to exist until 1516, when it united with Castilla to create Spain).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Arago, heraut1387CatalanRiquer Catalana
Arago, heraut1408CatalanRiquer Castellana
Arago, rey d'armas1431CatalanRiquer Catalana
Arago, heraldum domini Regis1400Latin (Catalan)Riquer Castellana
Aragon, rrey de armas1429SpanishRiquer Castellana
Araguon1455SpanishRiquer Castellana
Aragon1470SpanishRiquer Castellana
Le Roy d'armes d'Arragon1451FrenchMathieu
 

 
Arbre-d'Or Pursuivant - This French title is derived from the name of a pas d’armes; Domínguez Casas says that the pas also gave rise to an order name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Un poursuyvant nommé Arbre-d'orc. 1492Frenchde la Marche
 

 
Ardent Desir Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a motto or desirable trait; it means "ardent desire." It was used as a motto by Rene d'Anjou, who this herald served.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Ardent Desir1469Frenchde Merindol
 

 
Armyldoun Pursuivant or Herald - This Scottish title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title (Hamilton). Wagner and London date this title to 1482-1483 for Lord Hamilton in Scotland.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Armyltoun persewant1483ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
 

 
Arschoot Herald - This Spanish title is locative in origin, from the village of that name (modern Aarschot) in Belgium, which was a possession of the dukes of Burgundy, from whom it passed to the Spanish Habsburgs. He served the king of Spain in 1545, according to de Ceballos-Escalera.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Arschoot1545Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Artois Herald or King of Arms - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the county of Artois. According to Adam Even, he served Philip the Good, who was Count of Artois as well as Duke of Burgundy. He would later serve Philip the Fair (who married Juana of Spain), according to Domínguez Casas.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Johannes Sper, rex heraldorum comitatus Arthesie1390sLatin (French)Schnerb
roy d'armes d'Artois1414FrenchSchnerb
le roy d'armes d'Artoys1416FrenchSchnerb
roy d'armes du pays d'Artois1416FrenchSchnerb
Le Roy d'Arthois1438FrenchDomínguez Casas
Le Roy d'armes d'Arthois1448FrenchD'Escouchy
roi d'Artois1456FrenchNarbona Cárceles
Roy d'armes d'Artois1517Catalan or FrenchDomínguez Casas
 

 
Arundel Herald - This Scots title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say that it was "formerly the name of office of the herald maintained by the Earl of Arundel; now used for a herald extraordinary."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Arundell Herowd1415Scots?Godfrey
 

 
Asturias Herald - This Spanish title is locative in origin, derived from a royal title; Asturias was once an independent kingdom, and came to be used as the title of a prince of Castilla.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Asturias1442SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Athlone Herald or Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a town and castle in the English possessions in Ireland. Godfrey indicates that this office was created by Edward VI in 1552 and was for use in Ireland from 1566. It continued in use until relatively recently.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Athloone pursuivant-at-arms1557EnglishNational Archives
Athloon pursuivant d'armes d'Ireland1557EnglishNational Archives
Philip Athlone, pursuivant-at-arms1561EnglishGairdner and Brodie
 

 
Aulet Pursuivant - This English title is unclear in origin. Franklyn & Tanner identify this as an English title, but say it is "a privately maintained officer of arms of whom little more than the name is known." Friar dates it to 1383 and identifies the probable owner as Sir Peter Courteney, an English knight who Froissart also mentions. Aulet is a modern surname.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Aulet le Pursuivant1383LatinMuhlberger
 

 
Aumale Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the county of that name. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine, where it appears both as Aumale and Aumalle.
 

 
Auray Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the name of a town in Brittany. He served the dukes of Brittany in the fifteenth century, according to Jones Signes.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Auray1420FrenchJones Revue
 

 
Aurtt Herald - This English title is unclear in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say that it is "a privately maintained officer of arms c. 1450 of whom but little is known." Godfrey equates this title with Aulet, above, but the identification is not clear.
 

 
Auvergne Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the county of that name. It seems likely that he served the counts. He was at the Congress of Arras in 1435, according to Contamine. Narbona Cárceles links this herald with the dukes of Berry or their vassals.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Auvernia1400Spanish or LatinNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Avanguarda Herald - This Spanish title is a motto by origin, meaning "vanguard;" he served Alvaro de Luna, according to Riquer Castellana.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Faraute que deçian Avanguarda1434SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Avant-garde Herald - This French title is a motto by origin, meaning "vanguard."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Avant-garde1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Bar Pursuivant or Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the title of the counts and dukes of Bar.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bar1404FrenchSchnerb
Bar1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Barbançon Herald - This French title is locative in origin. He served Jean de Blois who ruled this location; the modern city of Barbençon is in Belgium. This herald is said by Adam Even to have been sent to Königsberg in 1363.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Barbenchon le hiraut1361Frenchvan den Neste
 

 
Bardolf Herald - This English title is derived from a surname (and noble title). Franklyn & Tanner say this herald was "active in 1399; an officer of arms maintained by Lord Bardolf."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bardolfe Heraldus Armorum22 R. 2 [1605]Latin (English)Thynne
Bardolfe1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Barnes Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say this herald was "maintained by Lord Berners, 1520-1533;" Godfrey gives Barnes as a variant. Godfrey indicates this is a garrison pursuivant and deputy to Calais Herald, where Lord Barnes served.
 

 
Bas Navarre Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the region of that name; George dates its use to period, though the form it took is unclear.
 

 
Bataille Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a motto; the word means "Battle." He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bataille1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Baugé Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name in the area of Anjou. He served the count of Anjou or one of his vassals, according to de Merindol.
 

 
Bayant Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin; he was at the 1435 Congress of Arras.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bayant1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Béarn Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the viscounty of Bearn; he presumably served the viscount, who was also the count of Foix (and in the latter fifteenth century king of Navarre).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Le dit herault ou pays de Bierne1448FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Beaumont Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from one of several locations (and castles) of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Beaumont1435FrenchChartier
Beaumont le herault1451FrenchD'Escouchy
Beaumont, herault d'armes de monseigneur le conte d'Alençon1451Frenchde Gruben
 

 
Beaurevoir Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from a possession of Jean de Luxembourg (where Joan of Arc of held prisoner). He served Jean de Luxembourg, according to Schnerb.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Beaurevoir1425FrenchSpitzparth
 

 
Beauvais Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the county of that name, which belonged to the bishops of Beauvais.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Beauvaiz1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Bedford Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say that this title was "maintained in the service of the Duke of Bedford, 1428." Godfrey says that the last dated use of this title was in 1435.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
His herald Bedford1578 (in a history describing 1428-9)EnglishHolinshed
 

 
Beja Herald - This Spanish title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. This herald served the dukes of Beja.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Beja faraute1477-1491SpanishCORDE s.n. faraute
 

 
Bellacueyll Pursuivant - This Spanish title is derived from a Catalan motto; it probably means "pick well." He served the condestable of Navarra in 1441, according to Ochoa & Ramos.
 

 
Bellesme Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a location in France. Franklyn & Tanner say that this pursuivant was "maintained by the Earl of Salisbury, 1421." This is probably an error, as the Bellesme name and title is associated with the Earls of Shrewsbury; this is noted by Moule.
 

 
Benon Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Count of Benon was the title of a son of Jean V of Brittany (who died in 1399). This title was in use from 1451 to 1470, and perhaps later. It may have take the form Benaon, according to Adam Even.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Benon nostre poursuivant1470FrenchJones
 

 
Bensilver Pursuivant - This English title is unclear in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say that this pursuivant was "active in 1443. Possibly identical with Biencele, Biencole, Binedelle, or Bientele and Bien Colier. Biendelle was maintained by Sir Richard Woodville, Lord Rivers; Bien Colier carried dispatches in 1444; but who maintained Bensilver is unknown." Dates for various forms of this title include 1444 for Bien Colier, 1434 and 1455 for Biencele.
 

 
Berry King of Arms - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Originally serving the dukes of Berry, this became a French royal title. The most famous person to hold this office was Gilles le Bouvier, who created the Armorial de Berry. It is not clear how long this title remained in use. Adam Even describes a Berry King of Arms by 1347.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Berri1446SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Berwick Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a placename. Franklyn & Tanner say "an officer of arms formerly attached to the Governor of Berwick. A Garrison Pursuivant for the Scottish border." Godfrey indicates that this title was in frequent use from Edward VI to Elizabeth I, and dates the last dated usage to 1602.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Berwyke, the herald-atarms [sic]1536EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Pursuivant of Berwick1537EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Barwyke1538EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Barwike pursuivant1541EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Berwick pursuivant1542EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Barweck Porscovant1542EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Barwik1542EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Barwik pursuivant1544EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Barewicke1605EnglishThynne
Barwicke1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Besource Pursuivant - This English title is unclear in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say that he was "active in 1380 when he received largesse from John O'Gaunt, but his master is not known."
 

 
Bethisy Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town or family of that name; he was at the 1435 Congress of Arras.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bethisy1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Bethune Herald - This Iberian title is locative in origin, from the town in Belgium of that name. It is also found as Bethume (in Riquer Castellana). It first belonged to the dukes of Burgundy, then came as a Hapsburg possession to the Spanish Crown. Velde dates it to 1522.
 

 
Beul Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say that this was "maintained by the captain of Bayeux Castle. Active in 1446."
 

 
Beyeren Herald - This Dutch title is locative in origin, probably from a town name. He served the dukes of Guelders. Franklyn & Tanner (s.n. Gelre) say that the son of the creator of the Gelre armorial held the title Beyren (he seems to have done some of the artwork in Gelre, and also held the title Gelre). Others have argued that they are the same person.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Beierenc. 1400DutchNijsten
mijns heren hieraut Beijer1403DutchVerbij-Schillings
Beyer den heraut1404DutchVerbij-Schillings
Beyeren1405DutchWagner H&H
Beyeren, onsen eerhald, coninc van den wapenender Ruyeren1411DutchVerbij-Schillings
Beyeren le heraut, roy des Ruyers1407FrenchVerbij-Schillings
Beyeren, quondam Gelre, armorum regis de Ruyeris1409Latin (Dutch)Verbij-Schillings
 

 
Biauvaux Pursuivant - This French title is probably locative in origin. He was at the Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Bien Aimé Pursuivant - This French title is a motto or desirable trait in origin, meaning "good friend." He served the seigneur of Haubordin, according to Spitzparth.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bien Aimé15th. c.FrenchSpitzparth
 

 
Bien Alaunt Pursuivant - This English title is probably derived from a motto, meaning "well ahead." Franklyn & Tanner say "probably maintained by the Earl of Warwick." Godfrey dates its usage to the reign of Henry VI.
 

 
Bien Colier Pursuivant - This English title may be derived from a motto or from a reference to an order collar. Franklyn & Tanner say that "Bien Colier carried dispatches in 1444." The complete entry says that Biensilver pursuivant was "active in 1443. Possibly identical with Biencele, Biencole, Binedelle, or Bientele and Bien Colier. Biendelle was maintained by Sir Richard Woodville, Lord Rivers; Bien Colier carried dispatches in 1444; but who maintained [it] is unknown." Dates for various forms of this title include 1444 for Bien Colier, 1434 and 1455 for Biencele.
 

 
Biencele Pursuivant - This English title is uncertain in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say that Biencele is dated to 1455. The complete entry says that Biensilver pursuivant was "active in 1443. Possibly identical with Biencele, Biencole, Binedelle, or Bientele and Bien Colier. Biendelle was maintained by Sir Richard Woodville, Lord Rivers; Bien Colier carried dispatches in 1444; but who maintained Bensilver is unknown." Dates for various forms of this title include 1444 for Bien Colier, 1434 and 1455 for Biencele.
 

 
Biencole Pursuivant - This English title is uncertain in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say that this is probably a variant of Bien Colier. The complete entry says that Biensilver pursuivant was "active in 1443. Possibly identical with Biencele, Biencole, Binedelle, or Bientele and Bien Colier. Biendelle was maintained by Sir Richard Woodville, Lord Rivers; Bien Colier carried dispatches in 1444; but who maintained Bensilver is unknown." Dates for various forms of this title include 1444 for Bien Colier, 1434 and 1455 for Biencele.
 

 
Biendelle Pursuivant - This English title is uncertain in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say that "Biendelle was maintained by Sir Richard Woodville, Lord Rivers." It also appears as Bientelle. The complete entry says that Biensilver Pursuivant was "active in 1443. Possibly identical with Biencele, Biencole, Binedelle, or Bientele and Bien Colier. Biendelle was maintained by Sir Richard Woodville, Lord Rivers; Bien Colier carried dispatches in 1444; but who maintained Bensilver is unknown." Dates for various forms of this title include 1444 for Bien Colier, 1434 and 1455 for Biencele.
 

 
Blanc Sanglier Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge (the white boar badge of Richard III). Franklyn & Tanner say "a pursuivant maintained by K. Ric. III." Godfrey indicates that this title was used both before and after Richard III accession to the throne in 1485. Wagner and London indicate that Blanch Sanglier is the preferred spelling of this title.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Blaunche Senglierc. 1547-8EnglishGodfrey
Blanke-Sanglier, Pursevaunte1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Blanch Lyon Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge. (Franklyn & Tanner say "name of office of an officer of arms formerly maintained by the Earl of Arundel." Godfrey indicates that this officer was a royal officer under Edward IV, that it lapsed under Henry VII, was revived in 1537, and from 1602 was an extraordinary officer of arms. Also found as Blanche Lyon.
 

 
Blanch Lyverer Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge (a greyhound). Franklyn & Tanner say "a name which appears to have been employed for one officer of arms only, 1418-19." Godfrey indicates that this officer was a royal herald.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Blanchlyverer pursevant1418EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Blanc Levrier Pursuivant - This Spanish title was derived from a badge of the prince Carlos (Charles) de Viana and served the king of Navarra. Domínguez Casas says that it was an order. It is dated to 1440 and 1442.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Blanc Leurier, heraldo del rey1421SpanishNarbona Cárceles
[I] Blanc Levrier heraut del rey1422Spanish Narbona Cárceles
[I] Blanch Levrier heraut de los seynnores rey et reyna1436Spanish Narbona Cárceles
Blanc Levrier, pursuivant de la reina Blanca1440Spanish Narbona Cárceles
Blanc Levrier porsuivant1440FrenchNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Blanche Rose Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge, the white rose badge of York. It also appers as Rose Blanche. Franklyn & Tanner say "in 1482 served the English ambassador to France. He brought the news of the death of King Louis XI."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Blanch Rose1542EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Rose-blanche1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Blanquefort Pursuivant - This (more or less) English title is derived from a location, one of the possessions of his owner. Franklyn & Tanner say that he "served as a Gascon adherent of K. Hen. VI." Godfrey indicates that this officer was a pursuivant to Sir Galiard of Durefort, Siegneur de Duras et Blanguefort, KG in 1462.
 

 
Bleu Levrier [Herald] - This French heraldic title is derived from a heraldic charge name; its rank is unclear. It is dated only to 1390, according to Adam Even.
 

 
Bluemantle Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a piece of regalia (the mantles of the Order of the Garter). Chesshyre & Ailes (1986) say that this title was created by Henry V for the Order of the Garter; the first confirmed evidence of this title is in 1448. He is a current pursuivant in ordinary.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Blewmantell Poursevunte1472EnglishMED s.n. esperaunce
Blewmantell purseyvant1472EnglishMED s.n. herad
a pursuyvant called Blewmantell1472EnglishMED s.n. herad
Blewmantell, purseyvant [vr. Poursevunte]1472EnglishMED s.n. pursevant
Blumantel1520EnglishJerdan
Blewmantell, a pursuivant at arms1536EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Bluemantle pursuivant1545EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Blumantell1564EnglishNational Archives
Blewmantel1599EnglishGodfrey
Blewmantell1605EnglishThynne
Blewmantle1605EnglishThynne
Blewmantill, the Quenis pursewant1504ScotsPaul
 

 
Bon Espoir Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a motto or desirable trait, meaning "good hope." Also found as Bonespoir. Franklyn & Tanner say "active in 1419. Probably maintained by the Earl of Huntingdon."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bonespoir1419FrenchJones
 

 
Bon Rapport Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a motto or desirable trait, meaning "good rapport." Franklyn & Tanner say "a privately maintained officer of arms; active c. 1450."
 

 
Bon Temps Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a motto, meaning "good times." It may also appear as Bontemps. Franklyn & Tanner say "probably privately maintained, but employed on the king's business in 1434."
 

 
Bon Vouloir Pursuivant - French title is a motto or desirable trait in origin, meaning "goodwill." He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine, who gives it as Bon Volloir and Bon Vouloir both.
 

 
Bonaventure Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a motto or desirable trait. Friar dates this to 1445 to Lord Hoo. Godfrey dates this officer as belonging to Thomas Hoo from 1445 to 1494. Hoo was not created Lord Hoo until sometime after 1445.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bonneaventure1445unclearRoemheld
Bonne-Aventure, pursuivant of Sir Thomas Hoot. Henry VIEnglishBardsley (s.n. Bonaventure)
Boneauentur pursevant1494-5ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
 

 
Bonne et Belle Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a motto, meaning "good and beautiful."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bonne et Belle1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Bonne Foy Pursuivant - This Spanish title is a motto in origin; it means "good faith." He served the kings of Navarre, according to Ochoa & Ramos; Narbona Cárceles says he served the prince of Viane (their heir) in the 1430s.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bonefox1426Catalan?de Ceballos-Escalera
Bonefoy1430-40Catalan?de Ceballos-Escalera
Bonne Foi1438Spanish Narbona Cárceles
 

 
Bonne Querelle Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a motto, meaning "good quarrel."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bonne Querelle1435FrenchRussell
 

 
Bonne Ville Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from a town of that name. He was at the Congress of Arras in 1435, according to Contamine.
 

 
Bonnes Nouvelles Herald - This French title is derived from a motto, meaning "good news." The duke of Savoy (Charles III) created this herald is 1518 to serve the Order of the Collar, according to Boulton.
 

 
Bordeaux Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from the city in which he served. Franklyn & Tanner say "an English officer of arms, serving as garrson and general duties herald in Bordeaux under K. Ric. II and K Hen. VI."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bordeaux1399FrenchNarbona Cárceles
Burdeux1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Borsele Herald - This Dutch title is locative in origin, named after the region that name in the modern Netherlands. The lords of Borsele were an important family in Burgundy. In 1377, he was in the service of the Duke of Brabant.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Borsele hiraut de Hollande1377Frenchvan den Neste
Borsele hiraut monseigneur le duck1377Frenchvan den Neste
 

 
Boulogne Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from an English possession in France, which was returned to France in 1550. Franklyn & Tanner say "a name of office of an English officer of arms created by K. Hen. VIII in 1544; abandoned in 1550."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Boloyne pursuivant at arms1546EnglishGairdner and Brodie
 

 
Bouloy Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the place of that name. He served the sires of Hunaudaye in 1487 according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Bourbon Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the dukes of Bourbon; this family would later become kings of France. It appears in 1390, according to Adam Even.
 

 
Bourbonnais Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from a region in France controlled by the dukes of Burbon; George dates this title to period.
 

 
Bourgogne Herald or King of Arms - This French title is locative in origin, from the title of the dukes of Burgundy, who he served.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bourgogne le héraut1426FrenchSchnerb
Bourgogne1435FrenchChartier
Bourgoingue1438FrenchDomínguez Casas
Bourgoigne1497FrenchDomínguez Casas
Borgoña, su rrey de armas1528?SpanishRiquer Castellana
The herald of Flandres callit Burgunze herald1532ScotsPaul
 

 
Brabant King of Arms - This title is locative in origin, derived from the Low Country duchy of Brabant. He served Philip the Good, who was duke of Burgundy as well as of Brabant, according to Adam Even. The title then came with the other Low Country holdings to the kings of Spain, who used it as a pursuivant's title.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Le Roy de Brabant1438FrenchDomínguez Casas
le roy de Brabant1449French Narbona Cárceles
Le Roy d'armes de Brebant1451FrenchMathieu
Roy d'armes de Brabant1517Catalan or FrenchDomínguez Casas
Brabante1517SpanishDomínguez Casas
Bravante1545Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Brandenburg Herald - This German title is locative in origin, derived from the noble title of the Margraves of Brandenburg, whom they presumably served.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Brandenburg1505GermanParavicini
 

 
Bray King of Arms - This French title is locative in origin, from the region of that name in northern France. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine. It is not clear whom he served.
 

 
Brest Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the name of a city. He served the dukes of Brittany.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Brest1419FrenchJones Revue
Brest1470FrenchJones
 

 
Bretagne Herald or King of Arms - This French title is locative in origin; it is derived from the title of the Dukes of Brittany (French Bretagne). The title begins in service to the dukes, but will later come into the service of the French crown.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bretange1398FrenchJones
Bretaigne1435FrenchChartier
Bretagne herault1477FrenchJones
Bretagne herault1477FrenchJones Revue
Bretaigne1477FrenchJones Revue
Bretaigne1487FrenchJones
Bretaigne premier herault de la Royne1508FrenchJones
 

 
Broke Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "in the service of Lord Broke; active 1489."
 

 
Brosses Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the community of Brosses in Burgundy; he presumably served the dukes of Burgundy. He was at the Congress of Arras in 1435, according to Contamine.
 

 
Broussel Herald - This French title is probably locative in origin; he was at the 1435 Congress of Arras.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Broussel1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Bruce Herald - This Scots title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Wagner and London say this title was created in 1401 for the herald of the Bruce.
 

 
Bruyere Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from one of the locations called La Bruyere; he was at the 1435 Congress of Arras.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bruyere1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Buckingham Herald - This English title is locative, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained by the dukes of Buckingham (down to 1514) and also described as Buckingham pursuivant." Godfrey dates the usage of this title from 1447 to 1514.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bukingham, pursevant1454EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Bucky Pursuivant - This English title is unclear in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say "a not very well authenticated name of office; c. 1490-1."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bukky pursevaunt1490EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Burggraf Pursuivant - This German title is derived from a form of address (burggraf - the governor of a town or judge of a castle).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Burckgraffc. 1470GermanNeubecker
Burggraf persevant1495GermanParavicini
 

 
Bute Pursuivant - This Scots title is locative in origin, derived from the Isle of Bute, which was the personal property of the Scottish monarchs.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Bwte purcyfant1489ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Bute pursewant1502-3ScotsPaul
Bute pursevante1552ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Bute pursevant to Marchemont herald1561ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Bute persevante1570ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Bute pursephant;1570ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
 

 
Butisy Pursuivant - This French title is unclear, but is probably locative in origin. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Cadran Herald - This English title is unclear in origin; the word cadran means "sundial." Godfrey says that Anstis leaned toward this interpretation, from a badge of the earls which included "a unicorn lying down amid rays of the sun." Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained by the Earl of Dorset, 1415.".
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Cadram Herauld to the Earle of Dorsett1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Calabre Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the French name for Calabria. It was associated with the kingdom of Sicily, and served Rene d'Anjou, whose son held the title Duke of Calabre or Calabria, though they did not hold Sicily.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Calabre1387French?Narbona Cárceles
Calabre1407FrenchWagner HoE
Calabre, roy d'armes d'Anjou1407FrenchWagner HoE
 

 
Calabria Herald - This Spanish herald was in service to the kings of Aragon who controlled the area (see Calabre above).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Calabria, eraut1450CatalanRiquer Catalana
 

 
Calais Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from an English possession in France. Franklyn & Tanner say "an office created by K Ed. IV which expired in 1558."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Cales, pursuyvant1472EnglishMED s.n. pursevant
Calais1520EnglishJerdan
Calais pursuivant1542EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Cales pursuivant1543EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Calis pursuivant1543EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Calleys1605EnglishThynne
Callys1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Calveley Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a locative surname. Franklyn & Tanner say "a privately maintained officer of arms, active in 1383, and probably in the service of Sir Hugh Calveley."
 

 
Cambridge Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained by the Earl of Cambridge, 1380."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Cantebrugg le heraude1380EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Camfier Pursuivant - This French title is probably locative in origin (Camfier is the name of an English garrison in France), but it appears in two forms (Camfier and Canisier) in two versions, and so cannot be clearly identified. Contamine thinks the two may be different pursuivants, and also gives the spelling Caufier. This title is only attested at the 1435 Congress of Arras.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Camfier [also Canisier]1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Canant Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin; it is a modern surname, but the surname's origin is unclear. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Candalle Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "in the service of the Earl of Kendal (1430); also modernized to 'Kendal Herald.'"
 

 
Cantaing Pursuivant - This French title is locative, from the town of that name. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Carlisle Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "created by K. Ed. III in 1327. The name fell into desuetude and was revived by K. Ric. III and employed till c. 1550. Revived again, early XVIII cent., as title for an extraordinary." Godfrey indicates that this title was last used in 1707.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Cardoeil (probably error for Carlisle)1337FrenchWagner H&H
Carliel Herauld of Armes1530English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Carliell Herauld of Armes1530English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Carolyle haraulde at armes1530English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Carlille herauldbefore 1534English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Carlisle Harold at Armys1534English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Carlill, herald off Ingland1531ScotsPaul
Carlisle herald1531EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Carlisle, pursuivant at arms1542EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Carleile1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Carrick Pursuivant - This Scots title is locative in origin, derived from a county that was a title bourne by Robert the Bruce before came to the throne. Wagner and London say it was in use from 1364-1488 as a private herald, then came into the use of the Scottish kings.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Carrik pursewant1488ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Carryk purcyfant1488ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Carrick pursuivant1514ScotsDSL s.n. wattir balze
pursevant to the king, berand the name of Carrik1526ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Carrik Pusevand1532ScotsPaul
Carrik pursevant1582-3ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Carrik pursuivant1545EnglishGairdner and Brodie
 

 
Castelbon Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the viscounty of Castelbon, which had become a possession of the Counts of Foix. The citation is a Catalan version of that name. He served the count of Foix, according to Navarrese records.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Castelbó1412CatalanNarbona Cárceles
Castellbo1414CatalanNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Castilla King of Arms - This Spanish title is locative in origin, derived from the name of the kingdom in which he was the chief herald. He served the kings of Castilla, who (together with the kings of Aragon) became the kings of Spain.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Castilla, rey de armes1429SpanishRiquer Castellana
Castilla1453SpanishRiquer Castellana
Castilla rey de armas1455Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
Castilla, rey d'armas1519SpanishRiquer Catalana
 

 
Cataluña Herald - This Spanish title is locative in origin, derived from an important region of Aragon. He served the kings of Aragon, who (together with the kings of Castilla) became the kings of Spain.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Cathalonya1416SpanishRiquer Castellana
Catalunya1479SpanishRiquer Castellana
Cataluña, eraute1519SpanishRiquer Castellana
Catalogna, haruat di lu senori Re1418CatalanRiquer Catalana
 

 
Cesar Jonesse Herald - This French title is unclear in origin. It is possibly a personal name, though Schnerb tends to think it a title. He served Charles de Lens in 1409-10.
 

 
Ceuta Herald - This Portuguese title is locative in origin. While modern Ceuta is Spanish, it was part of the Portuguese Algarve in period. Farinha Franco says that this title was subordinate to the Algarve King of Arms in the sixteenth century.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Cepta [sic]1424SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Chambois Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town in Normandy of that name. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Champagne King of Arms or Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the counts of Champagne. It was under royal control by shortly after 1400.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Roy de Champagne1407FrenchWagner HoE
 

 
Chandos Herald or King of Arms - This English title is a surname in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say "originally maintained by Sir John Chandos, but annexed to the Crown c. 1370."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Chandos1370FrenchAdam Even
Chaundos le heraud darmes1384FrenchJohnson
Chando le heraut1384FrenchJohnson
Camdos le hirault roy d'armes d'Engleterre1377Anglo-FrenchWagner HoE
 

 
Charlemaisnil Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town which appears in the 15th century Chronique de Enguerrand de Monstrelet in that spelling; its modern form is unclear. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Charolais Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the county of that name. Schnerb gives a citation that says he is the herald of the count of Charolais, but Friar and Wagner HoE say he is the herald of the Duke of Burgundy in the same period. He served Philip the Fair in Spain, according to Domínguez Casas.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Charolais1407FrenchSchnerb
Charrolais1413FrenchSchnerb
Charrolois, herault de monseigneur le conte de Charrolois1413FrenchSchnerb
Charrolois1438FrenchDomínguez Casas
Charollois le herault1451FrenchD'Escouchy
Charolois1497FrenchDomínguez Casas
Charoloix1500FrenchDomínguez Casas
 

 
Chastillon Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from one of several towns of that name; it is only attested at the 1435 Congress of Arras.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Chastillon1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Chastelaillon Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin; a herald of this title served the duke of Brittany in 1457-8, according to Jones Signes. This was a possession of the duke. Adam Even suggests it may also have taken the form Chateaulin. Chastillon above may be a form of this title. It appears in one account of the 1435 Congress of Arras as Chastel Laillon, according to Contamine.
 

 
Chastenoy Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from a town in Lorraine, whose dukes the pursuivant served, according to Adam Even.
 

 
Chasteau-Belin Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from a title of the dukes of Burgundy. Charles the Bold was described as Seigneur of Chateaubelin before he became duke. Riquer Castellana reports him as serving the duke.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Chasteau-Belin1435FrenchChartier
Chasteaubelin1440FrenchSpitzparth
Chateau-Belin, herault1449FrenchRiquer Castellana
Chasteaubellin le herault1451FrenchD'Escouchy
Xateobelin1441SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Chasteaubleu Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from the town today known as Chateaubleau. Friar dates this to 1465 as a herald of Lord Montjoy; also Chasteau Bleu.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Charten [sic] Blewe Pursevante1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Chasteaubriant Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from a noble title and town. A herald of this title served the lady of Chateaubriant in 1445, according to Adam Even.
 

 
Chasteauneuf Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the place of that name. He was in service to Pierre de Rieux, Marshall of France in 1436, according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Chasteau Regnault Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. It was a semi-independent territory which passed from the diocese of Leiege to the dukes of Nevers. It is not clear whom he served in 1451.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Chasteau-Regnauld le poursievant1451FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Chasteaulin Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name; he served the dukes of Brittany in 1457-8, according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Chester Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a possession of the Prince of Wales. Chesshyre & Ailes (1986) say that the first record of Chester dates to 1393, but may date even earlier.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Chestre Herrold1450Latin (Anglo-French)Godfrey
Chester1480English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Chester, heralt at armes1551-6EnglishHoby
Chester1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Cintra Pursuivant - This Portuguese title is locative in origin, from the town of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Cintra, persebant de la...señora doña Leonor de Aragon, Reina de Portugal1434SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Clarence Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a duchy sometimes granted to a son of the king. Franklyn & Tanner say "In 1420 both Clarenceux King of Arms and Clarence Herald met other English officers of arms on the Continent; hence, there can be no doubt of the existence of both." However, Clarence Herald seems to have been short lived.
 

 
Clarenceux King of Arms - This English title is derived from a locative origin; it is an adjectival form derived either from Clare or Clarence. Franklyn & Tanner say "also named Clarenceux Herald, was maintained by dukes of Clarence. In 1420 both Clarenceux King of Arms and Clarence Herald met other English officers of arms on the Continent; hence, there can be no doubt of the existence of both."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Clarencell Regi heraldo Armorium1334English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Roy d'armes des Clarenceux1420English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Clarencieux King of Armes1530English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Clarencieus1530-4English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Clarencyus1530-4English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Kynge at Armys called Clarenceaux1534English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Clarenciaux1562English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Clarenceulx1586English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Clarencieulx1586English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Clarencius1586English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Clarencyous1586English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Clarenceaux kyng of armes1441EnglishMED s.n. king of arms
Clarensew Kyng of Armes of the South Marche of Englond1451EnglishPatents
Clarensewe, Kyng of Armes... Clarensew1451EnglishMED s.n. armes
Clarensewe king of arms1454EnglishPatents
Clarensewe king of Armes1454EnglishMED s.n. king of arms
Mr. Clarencieux1562EnglishNichols
Clarencieulx1564EnglishNational Archives
Clarenfeux, King of Armes1465EnglishPatents
Clarenseux Kyng of Armes of the Southe Marches of Englond1466EnglishPatents
Clarenssevx Kyng of Armes1466EnglishPatents
Clarencieux, Kinge of Armes1472EnglishMED s.n. king of arms
Clarenseux Kyng of Armes1472EnglishMED s.n. armes
Clarentieulx King of Armes1478EnglishPatents
Clarenceaux principall Herauld & King of Arms1481EnglishPatents
Clarenceu King of Armes1482EnglishPatents
Clarenceux Roy Darmes1482EnglishPatents
Clarenceu principall heraulde and King of Armes1488EnglishPatents
Clarentioues king of arms of the south parts1555EnglishGodfrey
Mr. Clarentiaux1599EnglishGodfrey
Clarenceaux1605EnglishThynne
Clarenceux1605EnglishThynne
Clarencieulx King at Armes1476 [1605]EnglishThynne
Clarenctieux1605EnglishThynne
Clarencia1528SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Clermont Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a town in Lorraine. Wagner H&H lists him as belonging to the Duke of Lorraine from 1578 to 1580.
 

 
Cobergue Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a town in Lorraine. Wagner H&H lists him as belonging to the Duke of Lorraine from 1578 to 1580.
 

 
Cochim Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin, but probably locative; it may be linked to the German town of Coburg (which would eventually give its name to a duchy). He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Coimbra Herald - The Portuguese title is locative in origin; it was the capital of Portugal until the mid-thirteenth century and remained an important city. Norton says that a herald of this title was created during the reign of Joao I (1385-1433). Wagner H&H lists a Coimbres herald as belonging to the King of Portugal in 1386; this is probably the same. It may alternately be derived from the title of the dukes of Coimbr(o)es.
 

 
Collar Pursuivant - This English title is derived from regalia. Franklyn & Tanner say "a name of office derived from the collar of SS's, and employed down to 1488." Godfrey indicates this title was created in 1436.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Coler pursevant1450Latin (Anglo-French)Godfrey
 

 
Colombys Pursuivant - The existence of this English title is dubious. This may be a variant of Columbus Pursuivant, which may have been an extraordinary title in Ireland recorded by "some early writers," according to Franklyn & Tanner.
 

 
Comment qu'il soit Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a motto. This pursuivant served Richard d'Etampes (who was closely related to the duke of Brittany) in 1419-32; it also took the form Comme qu'il soit.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Comment qu'il soit1432FrenchSpitzparth
 

 
Comfort Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a motto. Franklyn & Tanner say "created by King Edward IV for service in France, but the origin of the name of office does not appear." Godfrey indicates this titled lapsed in 1479.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Confort1435FrenchRussell
 

 
Compos Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin. It is probably a motto in origin, related to the modern French word meaning "composed." Conflans is part of modern Paris, but was in the Middle Ages a town near the city..
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Compos, poursuivant du seigneur de Conflans1433Frenchde Gruben
 

 
Conde Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say "serving in France in 1428; name of office probably derived from Condé sur Noireau."
 

 
Conk Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say "a name of office current in the reign of K. Hen. VII; taken from the town of Corncarneau, Brittany;" also Conke.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Conke oon of our pursevants1490-1EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Conq Pursuivant - This French title is locative; like the English Conk, it is derived from Corncarneau or its neighbor Beauzac Conq.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Conq1474FrenchJones
 

 
Conquista Herald - This Spanish title is a motto in origin, meaning "conquest."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Un faraute que llamaban Conquista1429SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Constantinople Herald - This Portuguese title is locative in origin, derived from a city that it had no claim over. Norton says this title came in to use before 1400.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Constantinoble1408SpanishRiquer Castellana
Constantinople1414FrenchSchnerb
 

 
Contay Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. He was at the Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Corbie King of Arms - This French title is unclear in origin; it may be derived from the name of a heraldic charge or it may be locative in origin. Corbie was sent by Eustace de Renti to challenge John, lord Wells, to a tournament, according to Johnson. It exists by 1347.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Roy de Corby1384FrenchJohnson
Roi de Corby1384FrenchJohnson
Le Roy d'armes de Corbie1451FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Corbin Pursuivant - This title is derived from the name of a heraldic charge. Franklyn & Tanner say "name of office used in 1431 by a servant of the Duke of Bedford. Possibly from 'corbyn,' a crow in the arms of Richard Gethin whom Corbin served under the Duke of Bedford."
 

 
Cordoba [Herald] - This Spanish title is locative in origin, from the city of that name; he served the kings of Castilla, according to Velde.
 

 
Cornouaille Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a region in Burgundy. It is etymologically related to Cornwall, but is a different place. A pursuivant of this title served the dukes of Brittany in the mid fifteenth century, according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Cornwall Herald - This title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "created by K. Ric. II, probably to serve the Duke of Cornwall." Godfrey dates usage of this title from 1398-1413.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Cornwall Herald1398EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Couronne Herald - This French title is derived from an order name (Order of the Couronne or Crown, which was founded by the lords of Coucy, whom this herald served); George dates this title to period.
 

 
Coustance Pursuivant - This French title is probably locative in origin, from the town known today as Coutances. He was at the Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Crescent Pursuivant - This English title (derived from a heraldic charge) is dubious in origin. Wagner and London note that "Crescent is named by Oswald Barron as a pursuivant to the Percies," but indicate no references to this officer have been found, and suggest it is not subject to independent verification.
 

 
Croissant King of Arms - This French title is derived from an order name. The Order of the Croissant (Crescent) was founded by Rene of Anjou.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Croissant1451Frenchde Merindol
 

 
Croyslett Herald or Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a part of a heraldic charge. Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "in the service of the Earl of Derby, afterwards, K. Hen. IV, in 1390; probably maintained by the Earl of Warwick (Thomas Beauchamp); hence, the name of office, from the crosses-crosslets in the Beauchamp arms."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Croyslett1390-3EnglishStretton
 

 
Cyprus King of Arms - This title is derived from the name of the Mediterranian kingdom, which was ruled by a French dynasty. He attended a celebration in Burgundy in 1451, presumably as a representative of the Lusignan king, who was of French origin.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Le Roy d'armes de Cyppre1451FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
D'Anville Pursuivant - This This French title is derived from a surname (a locative surname, but including the preposition "of"). Contamine reads it as Damville.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
d'Anville1435FrenchChartier
 

 
D'Olite Herald - This French title is derived from a surname (a locative surname, but including the preposition "of"). He served the kingdom of Navarre in 1610, according to George.
 

 
Dampierre Herald or Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from one of several locations of that name. It is also found as Dampier.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Dampier1390-3EnglishStretton
Dampierre1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Darnaway Pursuivant - This Scottish title is locative in origin, from the castle of that name. Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "a name of office formerly employed in Scotland" and label it an extraordinary title. Wagner and London date this title as being used from 1499 to shortly after 1500 by the Earl of Moray.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Ternway pursewant1501ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
 

 
Dauphiné Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the region of name. This is the area from which the royal title Dauphin was taken. It appears as Dalphim in Catalan, where it dates to 1471 according to Riquer Catalana.
 

 
Dauferais Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin. He served the dukes of Brittany in 1434, according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Danmark King of Arms - This Scandinavian title is locative in origin, from the kingdom of that name (Denmark), according to Nissen and de Ceballos-Escalera.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Tennemark1411DanishGrosjean
Denemarken herolt1420sLow GermanGrosjean
Denmark herault of arms1490sEnglishGrosjean
 

 
Derby Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "in the service of the Earl of Derby (c. 1390), subsequently K. Hen. IV." Godfrey dates usage of this title from 1384 to 1413. He is mentioned several times in Froissart's Chronicles.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Derbyc. 1400FrenchFroissart
 

 
Derval Herald - This English title is locative in origin, from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "active in 1361, possibly in the service of Sir Robert Knollys; also known as Sire de Derval."
 

 
Desduit Pursuivant - This French title is a motto in origin.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Desduit1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Desiros Pursuivant - This Spanish (Catalan) title is a motto in origin, meaning "desirous;" he was found in Aragon, according to Riquer Catalana.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Desirós porsavant del molt illustre senyor1433Catalande Ceballos-Escalera
Desirós, porsevant1437CatalanRiquer Catalana
 

 
Desirous Pursuivant - This English title is a motto in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say that this was "an officer of arms in the service of the Crown, 1435."
 

 
Deutschland Herald - This German title is locative in origin, from a name for Germany. Its owner is unclear.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Deutschland1524GermanParavicini
Teutschland1530GermanKurras
 

 
Devoir Pursuivant - This English title is a motto in origin, meaning something like "One must." Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "maintained by Walter Lord Hungerford; active in 1429." Godfrey dates the last usage of this title to 1439. He may be the same herald who is mentioned as Desir in 1429, according to Godfrey.
 

 
Dieu y Pourvoye Pursuivant - This French title is a motto in origin, meaning "God will provide for it." Franklyn & Tanner say this was found in "1430, attached to the Provost of Paris."
 

 
Diligens Pursuivant - This French title is a motto or desirable trait in origin. He served Philibert de Vaudray, according to Spitzparth.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Diligence15th c.FrenchSpitzparth
 

 
Diligens Pursuivant - This Scottish title is a motto in origin, meaning "diligence." Franklyn & Tanner say this is "name of the office of a Scottish Pursuivant extraordinary: it was filled, in 1472, by one whose personal name is unknown, and who became Ross herald, known only as 'Diligens', in 1476."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Deligence pursewant1474ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
 

 
Diligent Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a motto or desirable trait. Franklyn & Tanner say this title was "active in 1431, maintained by Sir Ralph Neville."
 

 
Dinan Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the name of a town in Brittany. He served the dukes of Brittany in the fifteenth century.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Dinan poursivant a present nomme Rennes1450-7FrenchJones
Dinan t. Pierre II (Brittany)FrenchJones Revue
 

 
Dingwall Pursuivant - This Scottish title is locative in origin, named after the royal burgh of that name. Wagner and London dates him from 1478 to present as member of the Lyon Court.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Dinguale1479Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
Dyngwell herald1538ScotsPaul
Dingwell herald1538ScotsPaul
Dingwale purschewant [pr. pursehewant]1554ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Dingwall persowand1557ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Dingwell pursuivant1531-2EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Dingwell pursuivant1542EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Dyngwel pursuivant1543EnglishGairdner and Brodie
 

 
Dis-le-Vrai Pursuivant - This French title is a motto in origin, meaing "tell the truth." Its owner is unclear.
 

 
Donzy Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the place of that name. The counts of Nevers were descended from the house of Donzy. George dates this to period.
 

 
Dorset Herald - This English title is locative in origin, from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "in the service of Thomas Beaufort, Earl of Dorset, c. 1411; revived by K. Hen. VII in 1494 to serve Thomas Grey, Marquis of Dorset."
 

 
Douglas Pursuivant - This Scottish title is locative in origin, from a family byname. Wagner and London date this title from 1327 to 1410, and attribute it use to the Douglas family. The Glas of Chartier (which see) may be a version of this title.
 

 
Doulce-Pensée Pursuivant - This French title is a motto in origin, meaning "sweet thought." Its owner is unclear. George dates this to period.
 

 
Dragance Pursuivant - This Scottish title is unclear in origin. Dragance means "dragonwort" in French, but may be derived from "dragon." Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "name of office of a Scottish Pursuivant Extraordinary; filled in 1429 by one whose personal name is not on record."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Dragance le pursevant1429ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Dragance, servitori armorum1434Latin (Scots)DSL s.n. Signifer(e)
his pursivant Dragans1436EnglishMED s.n. pursevant
 

 
Dragon Herald - This French title is derived from the name of an order, founded in 1415 by the count of Foix. He served the count of Foix, according to Navarrese records.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Dragon1421French?Narbona Cárceles
 

 
Drake Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a surname or name for a heraldic charge. Franklyn & Tanner say (s.n. Ulster office) that this was recorded erroneously as an Irish officer of arms by "early writers." It may have been an extraordinary title.
 

 
Dublin Herald or Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. Franklyn & Tanner (s.n. Ulster office) say that this is a title held by a member of the Order of St. Patrick, rather than an Irish officer of arms. Godfrey indicates that this title is first found in 1502 and that it was revived in 1783 and lapsed in 1974.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Dyvelyn oon of Our officers of Arms1502EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Dundee Herald - This Scottish title is locative in origin, from the town of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Dondee1333FrenchWagner H&H
 

 
Eagle Pursuivant - This English title is derived from the name of a heraldic charge, though what eagle it refers to is unclear. Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "in the service of the [English] Crown in 1389."
 

 
Eagle Vert Pursuivant - This English title is derived from the name of a heraldic charge. Also Eagle-vert and Eaglevert. Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "maintained by the earls of Salisbury; named from the arms of Monthermer." Godfrey place a date of 1429 on this title.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Anglevert [sic]1429FrenchGodfrey
 

 
Eisvogl Herald - This German title is derived from the name of a heraldic charge (a kingfisher), probably from the badge of the Order of the Towel (Boulton shows a kingfisher on the order badge). He served the kings of Bohemia, if this supposition is correct.

 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Eisvogl, des kunigs herold1390GermanParavicini
 

 
Empire-Ville Pursuivant - This French title is of unclear (but probably locative) origin.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Empire-Ville1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Endure Pursuivant - This Scottish title is a motto in origin, from the motto of the Earl of Crawford, whom he served. Wagner and London date its use from 1454 to 1464.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Signifero dicto Endure1454ScotsDSL s.n. Signifer(e)
 

 
Enghien Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the location of that name in the modern Netherlands. He served Pierre de Luxembourg, lord of Enghien, according to Riquer Castellana. Like many other Dutch nobles and heralds, he would come to serve the Holy Roman Emperors and kings of Spain.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Enghien1435FrenchChartier
Enghine le herault1451FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Entensa Herald - This Spanish title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. Teresa de Entensa was the heiress who brought the Urgel title to the house of Barcelona. He served the counts of Urgel, according to a Navarrese record; in this case, it would be James of Urgell, who unsuccessfully pushed a claim to the throne of Aragon.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Entensa1411Spanish or CatalanNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Epinal Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the name of a town in the duchy of Lorraine, whose dukes this pursuivant served, according to Adam Even.
 

 
Ermine King of Arms or Herald - This French title is based on an order name; it served the dukes of Brittany. The Order of the Ermine was established in 1381, and took its name from the arms of the duchy. It also took the form Hermines.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Hermine1420FrenchJones Revue
Emime [sic]1435FrenchChartier
Ermine1470FrenchJones
 

 
Escama Herald - This Spanish title is derived from an order name, which is known in English as the Order of the Scale.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Escama, su faraute e mariscal de armas1441SpanishRiquer Castellana
Escama, faraute1455Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
España King of Arms - This Spanish title (derived from the name for the newly unified kingdoms of Aragon and Castilla) dates to 1477, according to Velde. After that the title seems to fall into disuse.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
España1477SpanishDomínguez Casas
 

 
Esperance Herbert Pursuivant - This heraldic title is mixed in origin, with a motto and surname origin. Wagner and London indicate that this officer was attached to the household of the Earl of Worcester in 1523.
 

 
Esperance Pursuivant - This English title is a motto in origin, meaning "hope" or "expectation." Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "maintained by Percy, Earl of Northumberland, but on more than one occasion was employed in the service of the Crown." Godfrey date usage of this title from 1438 to 1523.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Esperance purcevunte1472EnglishMED s.n. esperaunce
Esperaunce, purseyvant [vr. purcevunte] to therl of Northumberland1472EnglishMED s.n. pursevant
Esperaunce Pursevaunte1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Espinette Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, derived from modern Epinette; he seems to have served as the herald of the city himself. He was at the Congress of Arras in 1435, presumably with the forces of the Duke of Burgundy.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Espinette1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Espoir Pursuivant - This English title is a motto in origin, meaning "hope." Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "maintained by Sir John Lisle (1442)."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Espoir le poursievant1451FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Espy Herald - This French title is derived from the wheat-stalks (modern epi) in the regalia of the order of the Ermine, according to Jones; a herald of that title served the dukes of Brittany in the mid fifteenth century.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Espy1450-7FrenchJones
Espy1488FrenchJones
 

 
Estella Pursuivant - This Spanish title is locative in origin, derived from a city name. He served the king of Navarra, according to Ochoa & Ramos.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Estella, nuestro poursinant [sic] de heraut1396Spanish Narbona Cárceles
Esteylla porsabant del seynnor princep de Navarra1439Spanish Narbona Cárceles
 

 
Estoile Pursuivant - This French title is probably derived from an order name, that known as the Order of the Star in English.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
l'Estoille1435FrenchChartier
Estoille Poursuivant d'armes1446-7French Narbona Cárceles
 

 
Estoile Volant Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge. Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "also called 'Toell Volland'; was maintained by Sir Richard Wingfield, deputy of Calais, 1513-1519. It is probable that the badge was a winged star, the wings from the ca. Arms of Wingfield, the star from Lex Baux." It is the only example of a heraldic title based on a charge with a non-color modifying word that I know.
 

 
Estoutenay Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin, appearing only in a list of heralds at the 1435 Congress of Arras. Contamine reads it as Estournay.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Estoutenay1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Estramos Herald - This Portuguese title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. It also appears as Stramos. The title, in the spelling Estremoz, is dated to the 15th century, according to de Ceballos-Escalera.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Estremozfifteenth c.Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Etampes Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, named after a title (count of Etampes) that came into the line of the dukes of Brittany line through Francis II of Brittany (who came to the position in 1458). He served the dukes of Brittany from 1488-98, according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Ettrick Pursuivant - This Scottish title is locative in origin, from the reigion of that name. Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "a former Scottish name of office, known only for the holder being deprived, in 1571, for supporting rebels in Edinburgh Castle."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Ettrik pursevand extraordinary1569ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Ettrik pursevantis1571ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
 

 
Eu Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. He served the count of Nevers, who inherited the town in 1472, according to Adam Even.
 

 
Eudelet Pursuivant - This English title is unclear in origin; it appears only in a listing of heralds at the 1435 Congress of Arras.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Eudelet1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Eurbedelech (or Emdelech) Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin (and indeed in reading). He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Evreux King of Arms - This Navarese title is locative in origin, after the dynastic name of the kings of Navarre (before the 1440s). Later Navarra replaced him, according to Domínguez Casas. He served the kings of Navarre, according to Ochoa & Ramos.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Evreux, su heraldo1396SpanishNarbona Cárceles
Hevreux heraut del rey1399Spanish Narbona Cárceles
Evreux1413FrenchSchnerb
[name] dicho Evreux, heraut1413SpanishNarbona Cárceles
[name], llamado Evreux, heraldo de armas1413SpanishNarbona Cárceles
[name], llamado Evreux, mariscal de armas de Navarra1414SpanishNarbona Cárceles
[name], llamado Evreux, rey de armas del rey1414Spanish Narbona Cárceles
 

 
Exeter Herald - This English title is locative in origin, from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "maintained by the Duke of Exter, 1416." Godfrey dates last usage of this title to 1460.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Excestrie Herauld1452EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Falkland Pursuivant - This Scottish title is locative in origin, from the name of the royal burgh of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Falkland pursevant1537-8ScotsPaul
Falkland pursovant1548ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Falkland pursefand1562ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
 

 
Faucille Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a charge name; it means "sickle." Viriville (the editor of Chartier) notes that this spelling also appears in the Chroniques de Saint Denis. This may be the same as Franchville Pursuivant; if so, one is doubtless an error.
 

 
Faucon King of Arms or Herald or Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge. Also Falcon. Franklyn & Tanner say that this was a "name of office derived from the falcon on a fetterlock, 1359; employed also for a herald, a pursuivant, and, ultimately, a herald extraordinary, this last as recently as 1813."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Le Roy Faucon1359English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Colinet faucon1389EnglishGodfrey
Le roi Fauconc. 1400FrenchFroissart
Fauken herod1476EnglishGodfrey
Faulcon Pursevantt.Henry VIIEnglishBardsley (s.n. Falcon)
Fawcon pursuivant1531EnglishGairdner and Brodie
 

 
Faucon Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a heraldic charge and may be tied to the Order of the Tiercelet (young male falcon). He served the count of Foix, according to Schnerb.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Faucon1419FrenchSchnerb
Faucon1424FrenchPaviot
Faulcon1445FrenchPaviot
Faucon, poursuenti in armis1426Latin (French)Paviot
Falcon1605EnglishThynne
Fawcone1605EnglishThynne
Fawlcon Herauld1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Fesseaulx Pursuivant - This French title is probably locative, from the modern Fosseaux (Dazaut and Rostaing s.n. Fos).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Fesseaulx1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Feu Gregoiz Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin, possibly a motto; it means "Greek fire." It appears only at the 1435 Congress of Arras.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Feu Gregoiz1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Fesy Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the village known today as Fessy. He was at the Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Fitzwalter Pursuivant - This English title is a surname in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say this herald was "maintained by Lord Fitzwalter, 1485."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Fewater1485EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Flandres King of Arms - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the duchy of Flanders. He served Philip the Good, who was duke of Burgundy as well as of count of Flanders. It may also have appeared as Flanders and Flandre.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
roy de Flandres1419FrenchSchnerb
[name], roy d'armes de Flandres1420FrenchSchnerb
Le Roy de Flandres1438FrenchDomínguez Casas
le roy de Flandres1449FrenchNarbona Cárceles
Le Roy d'armes de Flandres1451FrenchD'Escouchy
Flandre [heraut]1545Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
Flandes1558Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Fleckenstein Herald - This German title is locative in origin, from the castle (and region) of that name. The entity was part of the Holy Roman Empire; presumably this herald served the lords of Fleckenstein (who became barons in 1467).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Fleckenstein1362GermanParavicini
 

 
Fleur-de-Lys Herald - This English title is derived from the name of a heraldic charge. Franklyn & Tanner say this herald was "named from the French quarter of the Royal Arms; promoted to Fleur-de-lys Herald in 1435." In 1435, he was "entrusted with a task in France."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Flour de Lice1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Fleur de Pensée Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a term for pansies; it means "flower of thought." He served the count of Anjou or one of his vassals, according to de Merindol.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Fleur de Pensée 1447-54Frenchde Merindol
 

 
Flores Herald - This Spanish title is unclear in origin, though it is probably locative in origin. He served the king of Castilla according to Navarrese records.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Flores1423SpanishNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Foix Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the counts of Foix, who this herald served.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Foiz1415French or SpanishNarbona Cárceles
Foix1423French or SpanishNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Fonterrabia Pursuivant - This Spanish title is locative in origin, from the town of Fonterrabia, in the Basque country. A pursuivant of that title was created in 1519.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Fonterrabia1519SpanishRiquer Catalana
 

 
Fores Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. He served Jean, duke of Bourbon, in 1424, according to Riquer Castellana.
 

 
Fougeres Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a town in Brittany, whose dukes a herald of this title served in 1488 and 1498, according to Jones Signes (and earlier, according to Jones).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Fougeres1450-7FrenchJones
 

 
Franche-conte Herald or Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the region of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Franche-conte1435FrenchChartier
France Conté, herault d'armes de mondit seigneur1451Frenchde Gruben
France-Comté1451FrenchD'Escouchy
Franche-Comte1545Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Francquevie Herald - This French title is a motto in origin, meaning "free life." He is described as the herald of the town of Valenciennes by D'Escouchy. Valenciennes was originally a margravate, but by 1100 became part of the county of Hainault; Hainault became a Burgundian possession, and later passed to the Holy Roman Empire.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Franke Vie hiraut1368Frenchvan den Neste
Francquevïe1451FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Franchville Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from one of several locations of that name; it appears in a list of heralds at the 1435 Congress of Arras. However, the Chronicle of St. Denis gives what seems to be the same title as Faucille. This title later passed with other Burgundian titles to the kings of Spain, who used it in 1545.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Franchville1435FrenchChartier
Franqueville1545Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
François Pursuivant - This French title is a surname in origin, in all probability. This title was used in Sicily in 1437-8, according to Jones. This is probably the herald of Rene d'Anjou, who ruled what we'd call Naples, rather than an Aragonese title, who controlled the island of Sicily.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
François1437FranceJones
 

 
Frechas Pursuivant - This Spanish title is derived from the name of a heraldic charge, from the badge of Isabel, queen of Castilla, that has a sheaf of arrows (modern flechas); he served the queen.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Frechas, pasavante1493SpanishDomínguez Casas
 

 
Fribourg Herald - This French heraldic title is locative in origin, from the city of that name in modern Switzerland. In 1454, it belonged to Savoy, whose duke he presumably served.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Fribourg1454FrenchSpitzparth
 

 
Frisia Herald - This Spanish title is locative in origin, from the region of that name. Like many parts of the Low Countries, part of Frisia was a Hapsburg possession. Domínguez Casas gives this as a sixteenth century title.
 

 
Frontiere Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin; it may be a motto (meaning "frontier") or a placename.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Frontiere1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Fuses Herald - This French title is unclear in origin. He was at the Congress of Arras in 1435, according to Contamine.
 

 
Fuzil Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a heraldic charge, the modern furison. He served the dukes of Burgundy, according to Domínguez Casas.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Fuzil1435FrenchChartier
Fuzil1438FrenchDomínguez Casas
Fusil1457FrenchSpitzparth
Fuzil, porsuivant d'armes de mondit seigneur1468FrenchHablot
Fuzil , poursuivant de l'ordre de la thoison d'or1432Frenchde Gruben
Fuzil , poursuivant de l'ordre de la thoison d'or1432Frenchde Gruben
Fusil, poursuivant de la thoison d'or1432Frenchde Gruben
Fuzil , poursuivant de l'ordre de la thoison d'or1432Frenchde Gruben
Fusil, poursuivant d'armes de monseigneur le duc1433Frenchde Gruben
[name], dit Fusil, poursuivant d'armes de mondit seigneur1464Frenchde Gruben
Fuzil , poursuivant d'armes de monseigneur15th. cFrenchde Gruben
 

 
Gabriel Pursuivant - This French title is that of a pursuivant serving Jean V, duke of Brittany (1344-99); it's not clear what its origin is, though Jones argues that it is derived from the name of the archangel.
 

 
Gahart Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the name of a priory. A pursuivant of this title served the dukes of Brittany in 1488-1490, according to Jones.
 

 
Garioch Pursuivant - This Scots title is locative in origin, derived from the lordship of that area. This title was used by the Earl of Mar, whom he served.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Garroch, the Erle of Marris pursewant1501ScotsPaul
Gareoch pursewant1503ScotsPaul
 

 
Garter King of Arms - This English title is derived from an order name. The Order of the Garter was the main order of England, founded in the 1340s. Chesshyre & Ailes (1986) say this herald was created in 1417; it remains in existence as the senior king of arms of English Officers of Arms.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Gartier1416English or Anglo-FrenchWagner HoE
Garter1530English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Gartyer1530English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Gartier1530English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Garter1586English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Garter principall king of Armes1595English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Gartier Roy d'armes dez angloisc. 1490Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Jartier, Roy d'armes des Angloys1415FrenchBoulton
Jartiere king of armes of ye Englishmen1419/20EnglishCollege of Arms
Gartier Roy darmes de Anglois1423EnglishPatents
Jarretier Roy Darmes dez Englois1439FrenchPatents
Garter King of Arms in the Realm of England1450EnglishPatents
Gartier Roy Darmes du Royaume Dangleterre1456EnglishPatents
Gartyer King of Arms of the English also Gartier1459/60EnglishPatents
Mayster Gartier, Principall Kinge of Armes1472EnglishMED s.n. king of arms
Mr Garter, principall King of Armes1472EnglishMED s.n. herad
gartier Roy d'armes dez anglois1490EnglishCollege of Arms
Garter K: of Armes of Englishmen1492EnglishPatents
Jarretiere Roy d'Arms de Angloisearly 16th c.FrenchWagner H&H
Mr. Garter1562EnglishNichols
Garter pincipall king of Armes1596EnglishCollege of Arms
Garter1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Gelre Herald - This Dutch title is locative in origin, from the noble title of the duke of Gueldres (Guelderland). Franklyn & Tanner say (s.n. Gelre, Armorial de) that "Claes Heynen [was] Gelre Herault de Arms to the Duc de Gueldres (Duke of Guelderland) from 1334 to 1372." This is the title of the author of the Gelre Armorial. Verbij-Schillings gives the spelling Gueldre for this title, but it may be modernized. He appears in 1435 at the Council of Arras with the party of the Duke of Burgundy as Guerle, according to Contamine.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Gelre, onse heralt1400DutchVerbij-Schillings
Gelre armorum Regis1405LatinWagner H&H
Beyeren, quondam Gelre, armorum regis de Ruyeris1409Latin (Dutch)Verbij-Schillings
 

 
Geneve Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the place of that name (Geneva); it was under the control of the counts of Savoy after 1394.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Genève1434FrenchPaviot
 

 
Gentil-Oiseau Pursuivant - This French title is a motto or desirable trait (of sorts) in origin; it means "gentle bird." He dates to 1415, according to Mathieu.
 

 
Genville Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin; it may be an error for Gonville. He was at the Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Georgenburg Herald - This German title is locative in origin, from the castle in the Teutonic Knights' Ordenstaat.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Georgenburg14th c.GermanParavicini
 

 
Gerlles Herald - This French title is locative in origin; Froissart gives it as a count's title. He was at the Congress of Arras in 1435, according to Contamine.
 

 
Germania Herald - This German title is locative in origin; it's derived from the Latin name for what would become Germany. Its owner is unclear.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Germania1507GermanParavicini
 

 
Germoles Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the lordship (later barony) of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Germoles1435FrenchSpitzparth
 

 
Girona Herald - This Spanish title is locative in origin, from a royal title of that name. The kings of Aragon often named their heir duke (later prince) of Girona. He served the kings of Aragon. Girona is the modern Catalan spelling; Gerona is the modern Spanish spelling.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Gerona1379CatalanRiquer Castellana
heraldo Mateo de Fauconyé, dictum Girona1389Catalande Ceballos-Escalera
Girona1387Latin (Spanish)Riquer Castellana
 

 
Glas Herald - This Scottish title may be derived from Douglas, which would make it locative in origin.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Glas1327FrenchWagner HoE
 

 
Gloucester King of Arms - This English title is locative in origin, from the duchy of that name. Franklyn & Tanner say he "served either Thomas of Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester, or Thomas Despencer, Earl of Gloucester (c. 1400). King Richard III had a Gloucester King of Arms but he seems to have been without a province" Godfrey indicates that this office lapsed in the reign of Henry VII, and was briefly revived in 1726.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Gloucestre1436EnglishGodfrey
Gloucester herald1531EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Gloucester Herauld1605EnglishThynne
Gloucester the Herauld of that Duke1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Goa Herald - This Portuguese title is locative in origin. Goa was the capital of Portuguese India. Farinha Franco says that that this title was subordinate to India King of Arms in the sixteenth century.
 

 
Gommignies Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from a noble title. The Siegneur of Gommignies is in northern France.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Gommegnies le hiraut1380Frenchvan den Neste
Gommignies le hérautc. 1400FrenchFroissart
 

 
Gonfanon Pursuivant - This French title is probably derived from the use of the gonfanon as a heraldic charge, as in the arms of the counts of Auvergne. It seems likely that he served the counts, but cannot be proved.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Gonfanon1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Gorkem Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin. He was a fifteenth century herald according to Spitzparth, but no period form is dated.
 

 
Gounzcuant Pursuivant - This Spanish title is unclear in origin; he served the kings of Navarra, according to Ochoa & Ramos. Ramos Aguirre dates the citation to 1443, but reads it as Correcant.
 

 
Granada King of Arms - This Spanish title is locative in origin; it appears after the conquest of Granada (1492). He served the kings of Aragon and Castilla, and later the kings of Spain.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Grenade1503FrenchDomínguez Casas
Granada, nuestro Rey de armas1505SpanishDomínguez Casas
Granada1522-6SpanishRiquer Catalana
 

 
Grant Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin. He served the dukes of Burgundy, according to Schnerb.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Grant, son poursuivant d'armes1414FrenchSchnerb
 

 
le Gras Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin, but appears to be derived from a family name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
le Gras1435FrenchRussell
 

 
Griffin Pursuivant - This English title is derived from the name of a heraldic charge. Franklyn & Tanner say he was "maintained by earls of Salisbury (1385); also spelt 'gryphon'." Godfrey dates the last usage of this title to 1473.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Gryffon pursuivant1388EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Griffon Herald - This Dutch title is derived from the name a heraldic charge. This herald served the count of Flanders in 1369. Another herald by this title is described as the herald of Bruges and still another as the herald of Yppre. It is possible that these represent a single person, however.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Griffon hiraut de Bruges1370Frenchvan den Neste
Grifon hiraut de Bruges1370sFrenchvan den Neste
Griffon le hiraut d'Ippre1373Frenchvan den Neste
Griffon hiraut le conte de Flandres1369Frenchvan den Neste
 

 
Groby Herald or Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from a family name. Franklyn & Tanner say he was "maintained by Thomas Grey, Lord Ferrers of Groby, 1475." Godfrey dates the last usage of this title to 1514.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Grobie Pursevaunt1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Gruuthuse Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from a noble title. He served the seigneur of Gruuthuse, according to Spitzparth.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Gruuthuse1461FrenchSpitzparth
 

 
Guerande Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin. A pursuivant of this title served the duke of Brittany in 1488, according to Jones and Jones Signes.
 

 
Guesclin Herald - This French title is locative in nature. He served Bertrand du Guesclin.
 

 
Guisnes Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from a place of that name. Franklyn & Tanner say this was "one of the garrison officers of arms in Picardy (1474). From Guines, near Calais." Godfrey indicates this title lapsed in 1558.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Geynes pursevant1510EnglishGodfrey
Guysnes1520EnglishJerdan
Guisnes pursuivant-at-arms1538EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Guysnes pursuivant1539EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Guynes herald1543EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Guisnes pursuivant1546EnglishGairdner and Brodie
 

 
Guingamp Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from a town and castle in Brittany. The title was in use by the dukes of Brittany from at least 1450-1494, according to Jones Signes.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Guingamp le poursuivant1474FrenchJones
 

 
Guville Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, perhaps from the modern Goville. He was at the Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Guyenne King of Arms or Herald or Pursuivant (English) - This English title is locative in origin, from an English name for the royal Aquitaine possessions in France. Franklyn & Tanner say this was "a XV cent. Office for service in the English possessions in France. There was also a Guyenne herald in the service of K. Hen. VI. During the reign of K. Hen V this officer of arms was known as 'Guienne and Aquitaine K. of A. (or vice versa)." Godfrey dates use of this title from 1306-1475.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Guyenne Rex Armorumc. 1400LatinWagner HoE
Guienne1417English or Anglo-FrenchWagner HoE
Guyan Pursevant1444EnglishGodfrey
Guyan King of Armes1461EnglishPatents
Gwyon Kinge of Armes1461EnglishPatents
Gyan King of Armes1461EnglishPatents
Guyon, Kinge of Armes1461EnglishMED s.n. armes
Gyen (kinge of armes)1472EnglishMED s.n. king of arms
Gyenne, Kinge of Armes1472EnglishMED s.n. king of arms
Guyen Herauld1605EnglishThynne
Guynes1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Guyenne King of Arms (French) - This French title is locative in origin, from the royal possession of that name. It is reported by a Spanish document to be the title of a French king of arms. The title is also used by the English, who had previously controlled Guyenne.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Guyenne1418FrenchSchnerb
Guyane1420FrenchNarbona Cárceles
Guiana1528SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Guyenne and Aquitaine King of Arms - This English title is derived from two existing locative titles. The already existing Guyenne King of Arms (which see) was renamed this from 1360 to around 1400, according to Wagner HoE. See also Aquitaine King of Arms.
 

 
Hailes Pursuivant - This Scottish title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say he was "an officer of arms maintained and probably created by the Earl of Bothwell in 1488. Office filled by George Schoriswood in 1508." One of Bothwell's titles was Lord Hailes.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Hales signifero1490-1ScotsDSL s.n. Halis
Halis pursewant1492ScotsDSL s.n. Halis
Hailis1497ScotsDSL s.n. Halis
Halys, the Erle of Bothuiles pusewant1506ScotsPaul
 

 
Hainault King of Arms or Herald or Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the noble title of the counts of Hainaut. He served the Philip the Good, who was duke of Burgundy as well as count of Hainaut. This title, like some other Burgundian titles, passed to the Holy Roman Empire, and thence to Spain. The herald cited below in Italian served Carlos V/I (HRE/Spain, respectively). Schnerb gives the spelling Haynnau as a period spelling otherwise unspecified (presumably French and 15th century).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Le Roy d'armes de Haynnault1451FrenchD'Escouchy
roy de Haynau1473Frenchde Gruben
Le Roy d'Haynaut1497FrenchDomínguez Casas
Roy d'armes de Haynnau1517Catalan or FrenchDomínguez Casas
Hainault1545Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
Haynault, Araldo d'Arme1546ItalianMedici
 

 
Hameltude Pursuivant - This English title is unclear in origin. Wagner and London suggest that this officer was a garrison pursuivant in the reign of Elizabeth I. Godfrey suggests that it is Ambleteuse, a garrision in France, and associate it with the title Newhaven.
 

 
Hampnes Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from the castle of that name. Franklyn & Tanner say he was "one of the garrison officers of arms in Picardy (1360). The name of office, also spelled 'Hammes' and 'Hannes', is derived from the castle near Calais. Now called Hames Castle." Godfrey dates last usage of this title to 1569.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Hammes1520EnglishJerdan
Hams pursuivant1531-2EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Hammes pursuivant1541EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Hampnes pursuivant1542EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Hampnes pursuivant1545EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Hampness1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Hannes Herald - This Burgundian herald appears in 1463; it may be a form of Hammes, which is a location or castle near Calais.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Hannes1463FrenchJones
 

 
Harington Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say he was "maintained by the Marquis of Dorset who became Lord of Harington in right of his wife (1475)."
 

 
Hastings Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say he was "maintained by William Lord Hastings (1479)." Godfrey dates the last usage to 1485.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Hastynges1486EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Hauter Herald - This French title is unclear in origin (perhaps locative); he served the Dukes of Bar, according to Riquer Castellana.
 

 
Helmenia Pursuivant - This Spanish title is unclear in origin (probably locative); he was sent by a Catalan nobleman to Suero de Quinones while planning the Passo Honroso (an important pas d'armes).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Helmenia porsavant1434SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Hembre Pursuivant - This English title is unclear in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say this was "one of the officers of arms accompanying the English ambassador at Arras, 1435." Contamine gives the title as Hambre in French context at Arras, but it's not clear this is the documentary spelling. Contamine also gives Hambuie, which may be a variant of this title.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Hembre1435FrenchChartier
Hembie1435FrenchChartier
Hembiere1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Henlic Pursuivant - This English title is unclear in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say that this herald was "one of the officers of arms in attendance on the English ambassador at Arras, 1435."
 

 
Hennebont Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name; a pursuivant of this title served the duke of Brittany in 1488-99, according to Jones.
 

 
Herbert Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a title derived from a surname. Franklyn & Tanner say that this herald was "maintained by Lord Herbert of Gower, c. 1525." Godfrey clarifies that his name was Charles Somerset; the name it appears was derived from Somerset's wife's first husband.
 

 
Hereford Herald - This English title is locative in origin, from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained by Humphry de Bohun, Earl of Hereford till 1373, when, on the death of the Earl, Hereford was taken into the royal service and held office under Kings Hen IV and V, attending the latter's coronation in 1413." Godfrey dates use of this title from 1369-1415 as a private herald, and from c. 1470 to 1474 by the Earl of Hereford.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Richardus Hereford heraud1370EnglishGodfrey
Hereforde Heraulde1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Hermenit Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin. He was at the Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Hincy Herald - This French title is unclear in origin; it may be a surname or unidentified location.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Hincy1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Holland Herald - This German, later French title is locative in origin, referring to the county of that name. In 1419, it was controlled by the countess of Hainault (who married the duke of Bavaria), but then it became a Burgundian possession, as reflected by the 1435 citation.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Holland1419GermanParavicini
Hollande1435FrenchChartier
Hollande15th c.FrenchVerbij-Schillings
 

 
Horne Pursuivant - This Dutch title is locative in origin, from a family name. Nijsten says that he was the herald of Arnoldus van Horn, bishop of Liege in the 1380s; he met with the future Henry IV on his travels in the early 1390s.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Hoern1380sDutchNijsten
Horne1390-3EnglishStretton
 

 
Houdenc Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, deriving from the modern Houdan, which was a possession of Brittany after 1317. It was used in Brittany in the reign of Jean V (1345-99), according to Jones.
 

 
Houdestorte Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the modern town of Hondschoote. He was at the Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Hunaudaye Pursuviant - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the name of a castle and a title. He served the lords of Hunaudaye, according to de Couffon de Kerdellech.
 

 
Huntingdon Herald - This English title is locative in origin, from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say that this herald was "maintained by the Earl of Huntingdon, c. 1450." Godfrey dates usage of this title from 1441-1458.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Ontindon, heraut1434CatalanRiquer Catalana
Huntingdon herauldbefore 1534English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
 

 
Ich Dien Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a motto, meaning "I serve." This German language motto is unusual for English; most mottos are in the vernacular (or in French for England, which was the courtly language). Franklyn & Tanner say that this herald "served the Prince of Wales, c. 1475."
 

 
Il dit vray Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a motto, meaning "he speaks the truth." He only appears at the 1435 Congress of Arras.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Il dit vray1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Il Faut Faire Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a motto, meaning "it must be done." Franklyn & Tanner say this herald was "maintained by Sir John Falstalf; named from his word or motto." Godfrey says that Anstis give this title as Aiyl Fauste Faire, which is obviously incorrect.
 

 
Indet Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin. He was at the Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
India King of Arms - This Portuguese title is locative in origin. Portugal had significant holdings in India, which this king of arms was in charge of in the sixteenth century, according to Farinha Franco. Norton says it's found in the fifteenth century.
 

 
Ireland Herald or King of Arms (English) - This English title is locative in origin, from the entity of that name, which it partially controlled. Franklyn & Tanner say that this title pertained to at least two different offices: a Scottish officer of arms (c. 1500) (see below) and "an English officer of arms first mentioned in 1389; supposed to have jurisdiction in Ireland, but attached to the English authority. The name fell in to Desuetude in 1487."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Roy d'Irlandc. 1400FrenchFroissart
Thomas Irland Rex Armorum Hiberniae1414EnglishGodfrey
Irland, Roy darmes des Irlandois1420EnglishGodfrey
Ireland King at Armes1476 [1605]EnglishThynne
Irelande1605EnglishThynne
Ireland King of Arms1482English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
 

 
Ireland Pursuivant (Scottish) - This Scottish title is locative in nature, from the entity of that name, which it did not control. Franklyn & Tanner say that this title pertained to at least two different offices: "a Scottish officer of arms (c. 1500) now obsolete" and an English officer of arms (see above.)
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Irland pursewant1501ScotsPaul
 

 
Islay Herald - This Scottish title is locative in origin, from a noble title. Wagner and London dates this title to 1494. It is a currently available title at the Lyon Court. According to Franklyn & Tanner, a title from the Lyon office, in abeyance since the mid 19th century. This is probably the same as Isle Herald, and is presumably derived from the title of the Lord of the Isles.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Iley1506-7ScotsPaul
Ylay herold1512ScotsDSL s.n. Her(r)ald
Unicorn and Ilay pursyphantis1548ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Iley herauldis1528Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
 

 
Jamais Herald - This Portuguese title is derived from a motto; it means "never." This herald served the kings of Portugal in the 15th century, according to de Ceballos-Escalera. Narbona Cárceles erroneously (I suppose) identifies this herald as French when he visits the French court in 1415.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Jamais1415Spanish or FrenchNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Jarnac Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name; he served the sire of Angoulême (Angolesme) in 1470-5.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Jarnac poursuyvant du sire d'Angolesme1470-5FrenchJones
 

 
Jerusalem Herald (French) - This French title (mentioned by Friar and dated by Wagner HoE) is locative in origin, from the city of that name, which was not under French control. However, the Angevine kings of Naples, and later, René d'Anjou, among others, claimed the kingship of Jerusalem.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Jherusalem1407FrenchWagner HoE
Jherusalem herault du roy de Secille et de Jherusalem1411FrenchSchnerb
 

 
Jerusalem Herald (German) - This German title is locative in origin, from the city of that name, which was not under control of the Holy Roman Empire or any other German entity. Fox-Davies lists this herald in passing as belonging to the Limmer Palatinate. Franklyn & Tanner mention a German who held this title: "George Ruxnen, published in 1522 Thurnier Buch, a study of tournaments." Woodward discusses the contents of the book further. Modern sources seem unaware of a Limmer Palatinate, but the book was published in modern Germany, and there were several Palatinates within the Holy Roman empire.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Hierusalem Eraldo1530GermanKurras
Jerusalem1530GermanKurras
 

 
Jerusalem Herald (Spanish) - This Spanish title is locative in nature, from the city of that name, which was not under Spanish control. The claim to kinship of Jerusalem was often tied to the throne of Naples, which was controlled by a cadet branch of the kings of Aragon, then directly by Aragon.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Jerusalem, rey d'armas1431SpanishRiquer Catalana
Jerusalem1447SpanishRiquer Castellana
Roy d'armas nommé Jerusalem1524SpanishRiquer Castellana
Jherusalem, roy d'armes du roy d'Arragon1451Frenchde Gruben
 

 
Joli-Couer Pursuivant - This French title is a motto in origin; it means "merry heart." George dates it to period.
 

 
Jop Herald - This Scottish title is unclear in origin. It's probably derived from a byname - Reaney and Wilson s.n. Job give several derivations for a byname that could take the form Jop, including from the given name Job and the word for "a fool." Wagner and London cite the Lord High Treasurer's reports for the existence of this officer of arms in the household of Sir William Wallace.
 

 
Joye Pursuivant - This English title is a motto in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say "one of the officers of arms maintained by Lord Scales (c. 1450)." He also appears as Joies.
 

 
Joieulx Pursuivant - This English title is a motto in origin; it means "joyous" or "merry." Franklyn & Tanner say that Joieux Pursuivant was "maintained by Lord Bonvill upon whom he was in attendance at the battle of St. Albans, 1455." Also Joyeux.
 

 
Josselin Herald - This French title is derived from a family name. He served the Viscounts of Rohan in the mid 15th c., according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Joyeux Aller Herald - This Spanish (Catalan) title is derived from a motto or desirable trait; it means "Go merrily." This herald visited Brittany in 1428. What may be the same herald appears as Joyós in a 1420s Catalan document.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Joyeux aller1428FrenchJones
 

 
Jugon Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the castle of that name; a pursuivant of this title served the duke of Brittany in 1488-1490.
 

 
Jülich Herald - This Dutch title is locative in origin, from the county (later duchy) of that name along the modern German/Dutch border. It was sometimes jointly held with the duchy of Guelders (Gelre), and has close ties to Dutch and French holding as well as German ones. Verbij-Schillings dates this herald in the French form Juliers to about 1400, though it's not clear if this was the c. 1400 spelling.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Jülich1364GermanParavicini
 

 
Jylland Pursuivant - This Scandinavian title is locative in origin, from the place known in English as Jutland. His existence is attested by de Ceballos-Escalera, who summarizes work by Ernst Verwohlt.
 

 
Kaiser Herald - This German title is derived from a title (derived from Latin Caesar, the best translation is perhaps "emperor"); he served the Holy Roman Emperors, who used this title.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Kayser1358GermanParavicini
Keyser1358GermanParavicini
 

 
Karlstein Herald - This German title is locative in origin, from the castle known in Czech as Karlštejn (this is the German form). According to Kuczysnki, he served the Czech king.
 

 
Kildare Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained by the Earl of Kildare, c. 1485; also called 'Galdare'."
 

 
Kintyre Pursuivant - This Scottish title is locative in origin, from the peninsula of Kintyre and a title of the Lord of the Isles (who was also lord of Kintyre). Wikipedia, s.n. Kintyre Pursuivant, asserts that he was originally the personal herald of the Lord of the Isles, ceded to the Crown in 1493. Wagner and London date his appearance as a royal Scottish officer from 1494 to present.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Kintyr purseuantc. 1494ScotsDSL s.n. Kentyr(e)
Kentire pursevant1494-5ScotsDSL s.n. Kentyr(e)
Kyntyre pursewant1500ScotsDSL s.n. Kentyr(e)
Kintyre pursevant1529ScotsDSL s.n. Kentyr(e)
Kintire pursevant1559-60ScotsDSL s.n. Kentyr(e)
Kintore pursevant1562ScotsDSL s.n. Kentyr(e)
Kyntyre pursevant1548ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Kintyre pursuivant1598ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Kintyre pursuivant1598ScotsDSL s.n. Kentyr(e)
 

 
Kleve Herald - This German title is locative in origin, from the county (later duchy) of that name; he served the counts (later dukes). Kuczysnki says that he served the dukes of Silesia and gives Cleve as a spelling.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Kleve1365GermanParavicini
 

 
Königsberg Herald - This German title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. Konigsburg was part of the Teutonic Knights' area of control, and a member of the Hanseatic League.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Königsberg14th c.GermanParavicini
 

 
Lamas Pursuivant - This Spanish title is unclear in origin, but is probably locative, from the small town of that name; he served the kings of Navarra, according to Ochoa & Ramos.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Lames1441CatalanNarbona Cárceles
Lamas1442-5CatalanRamos Aguirre
Lamies1442-5CatalanRamos Aguirre
Alamas1443Catalan?de Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Lancaster Herald or King of Arms - This English title is locative in origin, from a noble title (the royal duchy of Lancaster). Chesshyre & Ailes (1986) say that the title first appears between 1346 and 1348 and that he has been a herald in ordinary in 1464.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Johan de Lacastre heraud1358English or Anglo-NormanGodfrey
Lancastre Roy d'Armes del Northt. Henry IVEnglish or Anglo-FrenchWagner HoE
Lancastre Roy de North d'Angleterre herault1386English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Lancastrebefore 1534English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Lancastri le heraud1391EnglishMED s.n. herad
Lancestre Kyng of Armes1455EnglishPatents
Lancastre Kyng of Armes1455EnglishMED s.n. armes
Lancastre Kyng of Armes1456EnglishMED s.n. Lancaster
an harroulde called Lancaster1472EnglishMED s.n. herad
Lancaster1520EnglishJerdan
Lancaster herauldet. Henry VIIIEnglishWagner H&H
Lancaster Kinge of Armes1605EnglishThynne
Lancastre Regis Armorum1450Latin (English)Godfrey
 

 
Languedoc Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the region of that name; George dates its use to period.
 

 
Las Pursuivant - This Spanish title is derived from a badge of the king of Navarra; it means "knot"; he served the kings of Navarra, according to Ochoa & Ramos.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Las1448-52CatalanRamos Aguirre
 

 
Laudes Pursuivant - This Spanish or Catalan title is a motto or desirable trait in origin; it means "praise." It is unclear whom he served. Ramos Aguirre thinks that this may be an error for Lamas above, but the two citations some 35 years apart make this unlikely.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Laudes1442-5CatalanRamos Aguirre
Laudes1479SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Le Sparre Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from a noble title. Godfrey indicates that it was an officer of arms to Florimond, Lord of Le Sparre in Gascony from 1390-1455.
 

 
Leal Pursuivant - This Flemish title is derived from a motto, meaning "loyal;" he served Jacque Lalaing, according to Domínguez Casas (among others).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Leal, le poursuyvant dudict messire Jaques de Lalainc. 1492Frenchde la Marche
 

 
Leicester Herald or King of Arms - This heraldic title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "served John O'Gaunt (Earl of Leicester) 1380, and at his death became one of the king's officers of arms. The name fell into desuetude c. 1415, and was revived as name of office of a herald (not a king of arms) in 1478."
 

 
Lenbourt Herald - This French title is locative in origin; it is probably a variant of Lembourg (it appears in sixteenth century England as Lenbour). He was at the Congress of Arras in 1435, according to Contamine.
 

 
Leon King of Arms - This Spanish title is locative in origin, from the kingdom of that name. He served the kings of Castilla, with whom Leon had been unified long before.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Leon1477SpanishDomínguez Casas
León, rey d'armas1487SpanishDomínguez Casas
 

 
Leon d'Or Pursuivant - This English title is derived from the name of a heraldic charge. Franklyn & Tanner say "in the service of Lord Dudley (1446)."
 

 
Leopard Herald - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge. Franklyn & Tanner say "a name of office employed during the reigns of kings Henry V and VI, derived from the lions passant gardant in the Royal Arms, then called 'leopards'."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Libard Haraldo1432EnglishMED s.n. leopard
Libarde Heraulde1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Libertat Pursuivant - This Spanish (Catalan) title is derived from a motto (meaning liberty); he served the kings of Navarra, according to Ochoa & Ramos.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Libertat1451Catalan Narbona Cárceles
 

 
Liege Pursuivant - This Spanish title is a motto in origin (meaning liege); he served the king of Navarra, according to Riquer Castellana. It's possible that it's derived from the Belgian placename, but Liege did not come under Spanish control until the Hapsburgs became kings of a unified Spain. There is a Spanish Liesa, which might be an alternate origin.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Lieza1412-6Catalande Ceballos-Escalera
[name], llamado Liesse1412-6CatalanNarbona Cárceles
[name] du Lieça, poursuivant darmas de rey1413SpanishNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Ligny Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title (the county of that name). He was at the Congress of Arras, where he served either the duke of Burgundy or his vassal, the count of Saint Pol (who was also count of Ligny).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Ligne le hiraut1373Frenchvan den Neste
Lingney1435FrenchContamine
 

 
Limburg King of Arms - This French title is locative in nature, from the duchy of Limburg. According to Adam Even, he served Charles the Bold, who was duke of Burgundy as well as duke of Limburg. He also served Philip the Fair, who inherited most Burgundian territories.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Lembourg1500FrenchDomínguez Casas
Lembourg, le herault1468Frenchde Gruben
 

 
Limousin Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the region of that name. George dates it to period.
 

 
Lindsay Pursuivant - This Scottish title is locative in nature, derived from the family name of the earls of Crawford. Franklyn & Tanner say "an officer of arms formerly maintained by the Earl of Crawford." Wagner and London dates use of this title from 1398-1493.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Lindesay Herrold1493ScotsDSL s.n. Her(r)ald
 

 
Linlithgow Pursuivant - This Scottish title is locative in origin, derived from the name of a royal burgh. Franklyn & Tanner say "a name of office attached to the Lyon Court."
 

 
Lisboa Herald - This Portuguese title is locative in origin, from the capital of Portugal. Farinha Franco says that Lisbon was subordinate to the Portugal King of Arms at the end of the 16th c. Wagner HoE says that he visited England in 1452.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Lesbone harold of the King of Portingale1452English or Anglo-FrenchWagner HoE
 

 
Lisle Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from the viscounty granted first to Charles Brandon and later to Arthur Plantagenet (who we know best from the Lisle letters). Franklyn & Tanner say that this herald was "maintained by Viscount Lisle, c. 1533." Godfrey dates usage from 1513 to 1534, and suggest that he first served Sir Charles Brandon, who was then Viscount Lisle. He was raised to be Duke of Suffolk, and Lisle presumably went into abeyance for a few years until Arthur Plantagenet was named Lisle in 1523.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Lysley pourcevant1530sEnglishGodfrey
 

 
Litherland Herald - This German title is locative in origin, derived from the placename Lithuania. Kuczynski gives it as a period form, but does not specify further.
 

 
Liu Herald - This Spanish title is unclear in origin. It was recorded in Navarra, as the title of a herald from Castilla.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Liu1411French or SpanishNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Livland Herald - This Geman title is locative in origin, from Livonia, which was part of the Teutonic Knights' Ordenstaat. Schnerb says that by the fifteenth century he served the duke of Austria.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Livland14th c.GermanParavicini
Liflant1410FrenchSchnerb
 

 
Llaunes Pursuivant - This Spanish (Catalan) title is locative in origin, from a place of that name (it means "the basins"); it was found in Aragon, according to Riquer Catalana.
 

 
Lob den Frumen Pursuivant - This German title is a motto in origin, meaning "praise the worthy." Fox-Davies lists this herald in passing as belonging to Liechtenstein, which for our purposes means the family not the country. While the family controlled significant areas within the Holy Roman Empire, but did not control (or give their name to) the region until around 1700.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Lob den Frumen14th c.GermanParavicini
 

 
Lolland Pursuivant - This Scandinavian title is locative in origin; Lolland is a Danish island. He was a period Scandinavian herald, according to Nissen and de Ceballos-Escalera.
 

 
Longchamp Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin. Franklyn & Tanner say "in the service of the Lord of Courselles, and several times engaged as messenger between England and Normandy where the major tasks of his office were performed. (1433)" Godfrey dates usage of this title from 1433-1444.
 

 
Lonze Herald - This French title is unclear, but is probably locative in origin, from one of several places named Lons (there is a small possibility it is derived from Lonzee, in modern Belgium, but it seems unlikely as the count's possessions were in the south). He served the count of Le Marche, according to Narbona Cárceles.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Lonze1407FrenchNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Lorraine Herald or King of Arms - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. He served the dukes of Lorraine; by 1525 he was a king of arms, according to Adam Even.
 

 
Los Herald or King of Arms - This French title is derived from the motto of the Order of the Crescent (Los in Croissant 'Praise the crescent'). He served Rene d'Anjou. Boulton gives the title as a king of arms title.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Los1446Frenchde Merindol
[name] dit Los1469Frenchde Merindol
 

 
Lothier Herald - This French title is locative in nature, derived from the duchy of that name (located in the Low Countries). It became part of the possessions of the dukes of Burgundy. He travelled to Spain with Philip the Fair, according to Domínguez Casas.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Lothrine1497FrenchDomínguez Casas
 

 
Loudon Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. He served the count of Anjou, according to de Merindol.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
[name] dit Loudon1469Frenchde Merindol
 

 
Louvre Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from the palace in Paris. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained by the Duke of Bedford, Regent of France [for Henry VI of England, who claimed the throne of France]; hence, seated in the Palace of the Louvre. Employed chiefly in France, but on several occasions acted as messenger to England (c. 1430); also spelt 'Lovre' and 'Lover'." Godfrey dates usage of this title to 1435.
 

 
Louvain Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the city known as Leuven in Dutch, within the duchy of Brabant. A pursuivant of this title travelled with Philip the Fair in 1506, according to Domínguez Casas.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Louvain, coninc vander Ruwieren1429Dutchvan Anrooij King
Louvain1501FrenchDomínguez Casas
 

 
Louys Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a family name. He served the sires of Hunaudaye in 1488 according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Loveyn Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a family name. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained by Henry Bourchier who was closely allied to the family of Louvaine. Loveyn was employed in 1455 by K. Henry VI." It also appears as Lovaine and Lawayne.
 

 
Loyal Cœur [Herald] - This French title is derived from a motto or positive trait, meaning loyal heart. It is cited in 1461 by George, though its owner is unclear.
 

 
Loyante Pursuivant - This English title is a motto or desirable trait in origin; it means loyalty. Franklyn & Tanner say that a herald of this title was "on record as having carried documents between England and France in 1444, but by whom he was maintained is unknown".
 

 
Loyaulte Pursuivant - This French title is a motto or desirable trait in origin; it means loyalty.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Loyaulte1435FrenchChartier
Leaulté1435FrenchContamine
 

 
Luilly Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from a place near Reims. It appears in only one manuscript, in a list of French heralds who were at the Congress of Arras in 1435. Contamine gives what is probably the same herald as Lully, which is also a separate placename.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Luilly1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Lussa Herald - This French title is unclear, but is probably locative in origin, from the place known today as Lusse. He was recorded as a visitor to Navarra, where he was reported to be the herald of the count of Le Marche.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Lussa1411French or SpanishNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Luste Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Luxembourg Herald - This German title is locative in nature, derived from the family name of the House of Luxembourg, who provided several Holy Roman Emperors. According to Riquer Castellana, he served Jacques Lalaing. By c. 1500, he was in the service of Philip the Fair (who married Juana of Spain), according to Domínguez Casas.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Luxembourg1545Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Lyon King of Arms - This Scots title is derived from a heraldic charge, the lion on the Scottish arms. It appears well before 1400 and continues in use to the present day.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Lyone heralde1474ScotsDSL s.n. Lyon
Lioun Herald1501-2ScotsPaul
Lyon herhald1507ScotsDSL s.n. Her(r)ald
Lyoun herald1538ScotsPaul
lyoune king of armis1543ScotsBrown et al.
Lyoun Heroauld1554ScotsDSL s.n. Her(r)ald
Lord Lyon1632ScotsDSL s.n. Lyon
Leo heraldus1377Latin (Scots)DSL s.n. Lyon
Lyone regi armorum1488Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
Leoni regi armorum1528Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
Liouns Roy darmes Descoces1384FrenchJohnson
Lyoun king of armes1592EnglishWagner H&H
Lyon King of Arms1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Lyon Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge; he served Thomas Burgh in 1429, according to Godfrey. The lion is from his wife's arms.
 

 
Lyonnais Herald - This French title is locative in origin. The Lyonnais is the area around Lyon, which was part of Burgundy, then came under French control in 1313. George dates it to period.
 

 
Maienblüte Pursuivant - This German title is unclear in origin , but seems to be a motto. It can be understood to mean "may flowers." It is dated to the fourteenth century by Paravicini.
 

 
Maigniens King of Arms - Wagner H&H lists this herald in a literary work dated to 1285. However, most sources, including Wagner, suggest that this may be the name of the herald, rather than the title of the herald.
 

 
Maine Herald - This English title is locative in origin, from English possessions in France. Franklyn & Tanner say "functioned in the Province of Maine, France, and was maintained by the Duke of Bedford, 1428." Godfrey dates usage of this title to 1458.
 

 
Mains que le Pas Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a motto, meaning something like "slowly but surely". It was the motto of the seigneurs of Waurins in Flandret, according to le Bas.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Mains-que-le-Pas le poursievant1451FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Mala Corona Herald - This may or may not be a heraldic title; a person so described makes announcements in a crusader camp during the First Crusade in 1098. It is most likely a byname rather than a title. But heraldic sources list it: Wagner H&H lists this herald as belonging to Jerusalem in 1098.
 

 
Malestroit Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. He was in service to the lords of Brohun, according to Jones Signes, in 1434.
 

 
Malines Pursuivant - This Burgundian and later Spanish title is locative in origin, from the Low Countries lordship, Malines, according to de Ceballos-Escalera. A pursuivant of that title was created in 1519, according to Riquer Catalana. Domínguez Casas also gives it as Malines, but does not more firmly date it.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Malinas1519SpanishRiquer Catalana
 

 
Mallorca King of Arms - This Spanish title is locative in origin, from the kingdom of that name (Majorca in English), which was generally subordinated to the kings of Aragon, and incorporated into Aragon in 1349. He served the kings of Aragon. Velde documents the title.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Mallorca1548SpanishFernández de Oviedo
 

 
Malo King of Arms - This French title is derived from the name of Saint Malo, one of the "founding saints" of Brittany. There is also a place named Saint Malo. This king of arms served the dukes of Burgundy, but later became a French royal herald. Eysenbach says that "Malou" alone was also used as a war-cry by the Burgundian dukes; this may be the origin (though it's also possible that he's extrapolating from the title, as he also gives the long form "Saint Malo au riche duc").
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Malou, heraut1421FrenchJones Signes
Malo, nostre heraut1421FrenchJones Revue
Malo1425-6FrenchJones
Malo1435FrenchChartier
[name] dict Malo roy d'armes de Bretaigne1452FrenchJones Revue
roi d'armes de Bretagne appelé herault Malo1463FrenchJones Revue
Mallo, roy d'armes du roy nostre seigneur1518FrenchJones Revue
Mallo, roy d'armes du Roy notre siegneur1518-20FrenchJones
 

 
Maltravers Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from the title of Lord Maltravers, who he originally served in Calais in the 1540s, according to Godfrey. It was later revived as a title for a herald extraordinary.
 

 
March Herald or King of Arms or Pursuivant - This English title is unclear in origin, but is presumably locative in origin (from a placename meaning the boundary). March is dated by Godfrey to 1377-1490. Nothing is known about his responsibilities.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Le Marchis Regi Haraldorum1300LatinWagner H&H
Le Rey Marchis1300English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
March1386English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Herault nomme Marche1394English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Marche le herault1394English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Marche heraldiust. Henry IVEnglish or Anglo-FrenchWagner HoE
Marche king of armesc. 1490English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
March Kinge of ArmesunclearEnglish or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
March le heraltc. 1400FrenchFroissart
Marche, King of Armes1472EnglishMED s.n. herad
Marche, Kinge of Armes1472EnglishMED s.n. king of arms
Marche1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Le Marche Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the county of that name. He served the count of Le Marche, who was Jacques de Bourbon in the early 1400s.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
[name], dit La Marche, herault1412FrenchSchnerb
 

 
Marchmont Herald - This Scottish title is locative in origin, derived from the royal castle of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Marchmond' heraldis1488Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
Merchemount ... heraldis1600Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
Marchemond, herald1507, 1532-3ScotsPaul
Merchmond herald1531-2ScotsPaul
Bute pursevant to Marchemont herald1561ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
 

 
Marenceux Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "was maintained by the Earl of Worcester, 1462, and named from his Marenceux Lordship in Aquitaine."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Marenceu Pursevaunte1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Marleon de Aye Pursuivant - This English title means "nestling hawk," according to Godfrey, Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained by the Duke of Suffolk (c. 1522)."
 

 
Marouel Pursuivant - This French title is locative, from the town known today as Maroeuil. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
May Herald - This Spanish title is unclear in origin; a herald served the alférez of Navarra in 1392, according to Ochoa & Ramos.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
May, heraldo del alferez1396Spanish Narbona Cárceles
 

 
Memoire Pursuivant - This French title is a motto or desirable trait in origin; it means "memory."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Memoire1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Menou Pursuivant - This French title is locative, from the town of that name. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Merlyne Pursuivant - This English title is probably derived from a byname, but may be derived from the name of the bird. Godfrey indicates this title is an English title in use in 1444.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Merlyne pursevaunte1444EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Merode Pursuivant - This German title is locative in origin, derived from the byname of the noble house of Merode. They had both German and Dutch possessions at this time.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Merode1392GermanParavicini
 

 
Miaulde Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin, but it probably a byname in origin.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Miaulde1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Middeler Herald - This Dutch title is locative in origin, from the region known today as Middelaar, according to Nijsten.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Middeler1392DutchNijsten
 

 
Mirande Pursuivant - This French title is locative, from the region of that name. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Missenland Herald - This German title is locative in origin, probably from Meissen, according to Nijsten.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Myssenlantc. 1410DutchNijsten
Missenland Herald1421DutchNijsten
 

 
Monceux Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from one of several French towns called Monceux or Mouncells. Franklyn & Tanner say "was functioning in 1435, but nothing further is known. Also called 'Mouncells'."
 

 
Monfort Pursuivant - This French title is locative, from the modern town of Montfort. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Mongommery Herald - This title is given in a list of French heralds. It is locative in origin, from a town by that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Mongommery1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Monrauzier Pursuivant - This French title is locative, from the modern town of Montrozier. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Monreal Herald - This Spanish title is locative in nature, derived from the town of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Munt-real1429SpanishRiquer Castellana
Mósen Real, faraute1429SpanishRiquer Castellana
Monreal, faraute1434SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Monstereau-Bellay Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the fortress of that name (modern Montreuil-Bellay). He served Christophe d'Harcourt, according to Contamine, who also gives the title as Monsteroubelle.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Monstereau-Bellay1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Mont Saint-Michel King of Arms - This French title is locative in origin, from the location off the coast of Normandy where the Archangel is supposed to have appeared. The title was created by Louis IX, after 1469, in association with the Order of Saint Michel, according to Boulton.
 

 
Montagu Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a family name. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained by the Earl of Salisbury (William de Montagu), 1373." Wagner and London notes the records of the existence of Montacu pursuivant in 1471-2.
 

 
Monteagle Pursuivant - Not much is known about this English title; it may be a surname.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Monteagle herald, who has only the rank of a pursuivant1531EnglishGairdner and Brodie
 

 
Montemajour Herald - This Portuguese title is locative in nature, from some place of that name. He is reported to serve the king of Portugal by Spitzparth.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Montemajour1438FrenchSpitzparth
 

 
Montfort Herald or Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin; he served the dukes of Brittany. Montfort was the name of the house which came to control the duchy of Brittany in 1364.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Montfort1383FrenchJones
Monffort le Herault1473FrenchJones
 

 
Montinach Herald - This French title is locative, from the modern town of Montinach. He served the Marshall of France in 1407, according to Narbona Cárceles.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Montinach1407FrenchNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Montmiral Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the city of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Montmiral1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Montorgueil Herald - This English title is locative in origin, from the castle of that name of the Channel Islands. Franklyn & Tanner say "created by King Henry VII with jurisdiction in the Channel Islands." Godfrey dates use of this title from 1494 to 1553. Also spelled Montorgueill (which spelling is found in 1642 for the placename).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Mont Argule1516EnglishGodfrey
Mountorgel1520EnglishJerdan
Mountorguill1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Montpensier Pursuivant - This French title is locative, derived from the County of that name. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Monpennssier1435FrenchContamine
 

 
Montoion Pursuivant - This French title is presumably locative, but its identification is unclear. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Montrensuy or Mouzenzicy or Moreusny Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin; it is probably locative in origin. This name appears in several spellings in various manuscripts of Chartier.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Montrensuy or Mouzenzicy or Moreusny1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Montrose Pursuivant - This Scottish title is locative in origin, derived from the noble title of the dukes of Montrose. Wagner and London date this title to use in Scotland from 1488.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Montroyse harrolde1488ScotsDSL s.n. Montros
Rothssay and Montros harroldis1488ScotsDSL s.n. Montros
Montrose signiferis1488Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
 

 
Montroyal Pursuviant - This French title is locative in origin, from a town of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Montroyal1446FrenchSpitzparth
 

 
Morœl Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Morœl le poursievant1451FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Mortain Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "served the Duke of Clarence who, from 1415 was Lieutenant of France and Normandy. Later (1449), a Mortain was in the service of Edmund Beaufort, inter alia Count of Mortain. Also spelt 'Meriton' and 'Mariton'."
 

 
Mountjoye King of Arms - This French title is derived from the royal motto and warcry. The motto's origin is lost in myth, but the heraldic title is relatively late compared to other heraldic titles, first appearing only c. 1400.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Monjoy1407FrenchWagner HoE
Montjoye le heraut1411FrenchSchnerb
Montjoye1435FrenchChartier
Montjoye1606FrenchNicot
Monjoye Roy d'Armes de Francois1408English or Anglo-FrenchWagner HoE
Monjoie Roy d'armes des Francoisbefore 1450English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Montjoy, the Franch herald1507ScotsPaul
 

 
Mouzon Herald - This French title is locative, from a location of that name. He served the Dukes of Bar, according to Schnerb.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Mouzon1404FrenchSchnerb
 

 
Mowbray Herald - This English title is locative in origin, from a family name. Franklyn & Tanner say "originally in the service of the Duke of Norfolk; discontinued in the reign of King Henry VI. Revived 1623 as name of a herald extraordinary." Thomas de Mobray was created the first duke of Norfolk in 1397; his grandmother had been the Countess of Norfolk before him. Godfrey dates use of this title from 1392-1842.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Mowbray le herald1393EnglishMED s.n. heraud
Moubray1420EnglishGodfrey
Mowbray Heraulde1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Moxica King of Arms - This sixteenth century Spanish title is locative, derived from the New World possession of Mexico (which in early documents is often called Mexica), according to Riquer Castellana.
 

 
Murcia [Herald] - This Spanish title is locative in nature, from the city of that name. They served the kings of Castilla, according to Velde.
 

 
Namur Herald or King of Arms - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Wagner (in Heralds of England) lists this herald at a tournament which cannot be dated, noting that he was carrying the banner of the Sire de Voimes. Adam Even places Namur with the margravate of Namur, which became a title of the Burgundian dukes under Charles the Bold. From there it passed to the Holy Roman Emperors, as Domínguez Casas reports him serving Carlos V or I (of Spain).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Namur1435FrenchChartier
Namur le herault1448FrenchD'Escouchy
Namur, herault d'armes1517Catalan or FrenchDomínguez Casas
 

 
Nancy Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. It was a capital of Lorraine, whose dukes this pursuivant served, according to Adam Even.
 

 
Nantes Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin; Nantes was a substantial town and sometimes capital of Brittany, whose duke Nantes served, according to Jones.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Nantes1450-7FrenchJones
 

 
Napoles King of Arms - This Spanish title is locative in origin, from the kingdom of that name, which was tied closely to Aragon, and sometimes incorporated in it. Velde says this title came into use in Aragon after 1504.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Nápoles1548SpanishFernández de Oviedo
 

 
Navarre Herald / Navarra King of Arms or Herald - Navarra's situation is complicated, with the kingdom at times being closely tied to France and at others to Spain. Eventually the kingdom would be split between the countries. The dominant language was closely related to Catalan, but French and Spanish at various points served as the courtly documentary language as well. The title appears both in French (Navarre) and Iberian (Navarra) forms. The title passed to Spain in 1513, when the bulk of Navarra became part of Spain.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
l'herald Navarrafourteenth c.CatalanRiquer Catalana
Heraut Navarre1368-75FrenchWagner H&H
Navarrec. 1370FrenchNarbona Cárceles
Nauarra1392Spanish Narbona Cárceles
[name] llamado Navarra, rey de armas1412Spanish Narbona Cárceles
Navarra rey d'armas1439Spanish Narbona Cárceles
Navarra, rey de armas1443SpanishNarbona Cárceles
Navarra...rey d'armas1519SpanishRiquer Catalana
 

 
Nazers Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from the location of the battle of Najara. Franklyn & Tanner say "created by K. Edward III in celebration of the victory of Najara, 1367."
 

 
Nemours Herald - This Spanish title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. The kings of Navarra were also dukes of Nemours of France in the early 15th century. This herald served the kings of Navarra around 1400, according to Ochoa & Ramos.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
[name], llamado Nemours, heraldo de armas1413Spanish Narbona Cárceles
[name], llamado Nemoux, su heraldo1416Spanish Narbona Cárceles
 

 
Nevers Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from a noble title. He served the count of Nevers.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Nevers1404FrenchSchnerb
 

 
Neufchastel Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from a noble title. This herald served the lords of Neufchatel, according to Schnerb.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Neufchastel le herault1410FrenchSchnerb
 

 
Newhaven Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from a fort in France; it also appears as New Haven. Franklyn & Tanner say "name of office of the garrison pursuivant at Ambleteuse, 1544, and of a similar officer at Le Havre, 1562."
 

 
Nogent Pursuivant - This English title is derived from the town and castle of that name, in Maine, France. Franklyn & Tanner say "Maine Herald's junior, 1449." Maine "functioned in the Province of Maine, France, and was maintained by the Duke of Bedford, 1428."
 

 
Noir Lyon Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained by Viscount Wells, who died 1498, the name is from the lion sable in his arms."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Noirlion his owne poursurvant1498EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Noir Taureau Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained by the Duke of Clarence; named from the Black Bull, of that House. Also spelt 'Noyre Tauren'." The bull was the livery badge of George, the duke of Clarence who died in 1478.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Noyre-Tauren, Pursevaunte1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Norenbuch Herald - This Dutch title is probably locative in origin, an error for Norenburch (Nuremburg). While this may be the German location, there may be a Dutch location of the same name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Norenbuch15th c.DutchVerbij-Schillings
 

 
Norfolk Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. This herald in early years sometimes served the duke of Norfolk, but mostly functioned as a royal herald. It is still used as an extraordinary title.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Norfolk herald1541EnglishGairdner and Brodie
 

 
Normandie King of Arms - This French title is locative in origin, from the duchy of Normandy. A possession of the kings of England after 1066, it retuned to French control by the early thirteenth century, though its formal possession would not be settled until mid-century.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Normandie1407FrenchAdam Even
roy d'armes Normandie1501FrenchMathieu
dit Normendie1501FrenchMathieu
Normandy1601EnglishWhitlock
 

 
Norreys King of Arms - This English title is locative in origin. Its origin is a bit confused. Forms like Norreys suggest a derivation from Norreis 'inhabitants of northern England' (MED s.n. Norries), which would parallel some early descriptions of Garter as Roy des Anglois 'king of the English.' Other forms, like Norroy, suggest a compound origin of north + roy meaning "king of the north." A mixed form mixing Norreys and roy is even proposed. Whichever is the original derivation, both derivations are clearly accepted quite early, as both sorts of forms are found before 1400.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Andreas Norrois (or de Noreys) Rex Heraldorum1338Latin (English)Godfrey
Andrew Windsore Norrey regi Heraldorum12 Edward 3 [1600]Latin (English)Leigh
Andreas Roy Norreys1348Anglo-FrenchGodfrey
Noreys1386English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Rex Norreyst. Henry IVEnglish or Anglo-FrenchWagner HoE
Roy d'armes de Norroyt. Henry VIIIEnglish or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Norrey kyng of armes1586English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Norrey, Kinge of Armes1472EnglishMED s.n. king of arms
Norrey, Kinge of Armes1479EnglishPatents
Norroy King of Arms of the Northern parts of this Kingdom of England1480EnglishPatents
Norrey King of Armes of the North parties of the Realme of England1494EnglishPatents
Mr. Norrye, heralt at armes1554-6EnglishHoby
Noewy king of armes of the north partes1555EnglishGodfrey
Norroy Roy d'armes1564EnglishNational Archives
Norrey1605EnglishThynne
Norroy1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Northampton Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "served Humphrey de Bohun who was, inter alia, Earl of Northampton." Godfrey dates use of this title to 1372.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Norhampton Haraldam1383LatinMuhlberger
Norhampton le heraud1384FrenchJohnson
Norrempton1384FrenchSchnerb
 

 
Northumberland Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Godfrey says that this herald served the Earl of Northumberland from Edward IV to Henry VIII, and served as a royal extraordinary herald from 1527-1529.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Northumberland herald1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Norway King of Arms - This Scandinavian title is locative in origin, derived from the kingdom of Norway. de Ceballos-Escalera gives it as Norge without a clear date.
 

 
Nottingham Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "in 1399 serving the Duke of Norfolk in his capacity of Earl of Nottingham described as a royal officer of arms when functioning at the coronation of King Henry V's consort, Queen Katherine (1421). King Henry VIII bestowed the name on a pursuivant in the service of his natural son, Henry Fitzroy, inter alia, Earl of Nottingham." It was used in 1778, but seems to have not been used since.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Notyngham herald1399EnglishGodfrey
Notyngham signifierfourteenth or fifteenth c.EnglishGodfrey
Notingham, one of the King's pursuivants1532EnglishGairdner and Brodie
 

 
Noyre Fawcone Herald - This English title is possibly "a mistake, which got into print, for 'Noir Taureau,'" according to Franklyn & Tanner. If this is not true, it's another example of a title derived from a heraldic charge.
 

 
Nucells Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "in the service of Anthony Woodville, Earl Rivers, Lord Scales, and Nucells, 1446." Godfrey dates last use of this title to 1470.
 

 
Oliffant Pursuivant - This French title is, according to Jones, probably derived from the name of Roland's horn. Alternately, it may be derived from a heraldic charge (elephant). A person holding this title served the duke of Brittany in 1430.
 

 
Or Soit Ainsi [Herald] - This French title is derived from a motto, meaning "so be it." He served Guy de Bar, according to Schnerb.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Or soit ainsi1418FrenchSchnerb
 

 
Oran Pursuivant - This Spanish title is locative, from the town of that name. He served the king of Spain in the sixteenth century.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Orán1531Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Orenge Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the modern town of Orange or the quasi-independent principality which was organized around it (which was not a royal French possession until well after 1600).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Orenge1435FrenchChartier
Oranges1545Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Orkney Herald - This Scottish title is locative in origin, from the Orkney Isles or the creation of the Earls of Orkney. It was probably created in late period.
 

 
Orleans Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the duchy of Orleans, which became a royal possession early in the Middle Ages.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Orleans1407FrenchWagner HoE
Orleans1435FrenchChartier
Orleance1601EnglishWhitlock
 

 
Ormond Pursuivant - This Scottish title is locative in origin, named after a noble title (probably that given to a younger son of the king in 1476). Ormonde was a title in the Lyon office before the nineteenth century. Wagner and London date use of this title to 1488. Electrum observes, "It should be noted that while this is not currently is use at Lyon Court, it is available for use if so desired by a new officer."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Ormond'... signiferis1488Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
Ormount ... signiferis1600Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
Ormond pursevand1494ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Ormund pursewant1502-3ScotsPaul
Ormond, persevant1540ScotsPaul
 

 
Orval Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from a noble title. The counts of Dreux were also seigneurs de Orval.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Ung herault d'armes, nomme Orval1450FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Österreich Herald - This German title is locative in origin, derived from the title of the dukes of Austria. The dukes of Austria would become the Holy Roman Emperors. He travelled in 1506 with Philip the Fair, according to Domínguez Casas; after that, it would be used by the kings of Spain, who were also the Holy Roman Emperors.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Osterich eerhalld1422-61Germanvan Anrooij
erhallt des haus zu Osterich, knog der wappen von Ruifir1422-61Germanvan Anrooij
Österreich1440GermanParavicini
Osterich1440sGermanvan Anrooij
Össterrich1440Latin (German)van Anrooij King
Austriche, heraut du duc d'Austriche1434Frenchvan Anrooij
Austeriche, herault du duc Aubert d'Austeriche1434Frenchde Gruben
Austriche, heraut du roi des Romains1439Frenchvan Anrooij
Osterich1449Frenchvan Anrooij King
Austrice1545Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Ostrevant Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the county of that name (in the Low Countries), which was part of Hainault. He served the dukes of Burgundy, according to Domínguez Casas.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Ostrevant1501FrenchDomínguez Casas
 

 
l'Ours Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a heraldic charge, which appears as a supporter in the arms of Bruges. He served the city of Bruges, according to Schnerb. It appears in an unclear form at the Congress of Arras.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Jeannin L'Ours1407FrenchSchnerb
lours1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Paine por joie Pursuivant - This Portuguese title is a motto in origin (in French or Catalan: "pain for joy"); he served Pedro of Portugal.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Paine por joie1464SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Palis Herald - This French title is locative, from the town of that name. He served the count of Saint Pol, according to Schnerb.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Palis, herault de monseigneur le comte de Saint Pol1412FrenchSchnerb
Pallis, nostre herault1413FrenchSchnerb
Palis1416FrenchSchnerb
Palis, herault de feu nostre tres chier et amé cousin le conte de Ligny et de Saint Pol1416FrenchSchnerb
ung... herault nommé Palis1417FrenchSchnerb
 

 
Pamplona Herald - This Spanish title is locative in origin, derived from the city of Pamplona. He served the king of Navarra, according to Riquer Castellana, as well as Ochoa & Ramos.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Pampelune le Heraut1386French Narbona Cárceles
Pamplona, su heraldo1386Spanish Narbona Cárceles
Pamplona, araut del Rey de Navarra1392SpanishRiquer Castellana
Pamplona, nuestro heraut1392Spanish?Narbona Cárceles
Pamplona, heraldo de armas1423Spanish Narbona Cárceles
Pamplona, faurate1429SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Papillon Pursuivant - This French title is derived from the name of a heraldic charge (butterfly). Franklyn & Tanner say "in the service of the Earl of Langueville, K.G., 1423." Godfrey indicates this title was in use to perhaps 1449.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Papillon1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Parthenay Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin; it is derived from a possession of the duke of Brittany, whom he served.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Partenay1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Passavant Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a motto or perhaps a byname. Reaney and Wilson (s.n. Passant) give the derivation of this as "passe avante 'go on in front.'" Franklyn & Tanner say "was maintained by Sir Thomas Stainer, 1431."
 

 
Passe oultre Pursuivant - This French title is a motto in origin, meaning "go further." A pursuivant of this title served the bastard son of the duke of Brittany in 1434, according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Patiens Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a motto or desirable trait (modern "patience"). Godfrey indicates that this was an English title for use in Normandy in 1447.
 

 
Pelerin Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin; it may be locative in origin, or from a surname. He was a fifteenth century French (probabably Burgundian) herald, according to Spitzparth.
 

 
Pelerin Pursuivant - This Portuguese title is derived from a heraldic charge. A herald of this title served the king of Portugal in the fifteenth century, according to de Ceballos-Escalera.
 

 
Pembroke Herald - This English title is locative in origin, from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained, 1424, by Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, Earl of Pembroke."
 

 
Peñafiel Herald - This Spanish title is locative in orign, from the ducal title; it is a royal title of Aragon.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Peñafiel, heraldo del infante Ferrando de Castilla1406Spanish Narbona Cárceles
 

 
Percepelle Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin, but is probably a byname in origin; a pursuivant of this title served the duke of Brittany in 1488, according to Jones Signes. It may also appear as Pierre Pille.
 

 
Percy Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained in the service of the House of Percy by the Earl of Northumberland, 1385." Godfrey dates its last use to circa. 1410.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Percye Heraulde1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Perpignan Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. This herald was created by the kings of France to mark the conquest of this town from the Aragonese kings, according to Adam Even.
 

 
Perigord Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the region of that name. George dates it to period.
 

 
Picardie Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the name applied to a rather nebulous region of northern France. George dates it to period.
 

 
Pierrepont Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Pierrepont1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Pisore Pursuivant - This English title is of unclear origin. Franklyn & Tanner say that this herald "also spelt 'Pisow' and 'Pysore'" was made Salisbury Herald in the 1375 by the Earl of Salisbury.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Pysore1388EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Plain ville Pursuivant - This French title is locative, from town known today as Plainville. He was at the Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Plaisance Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a motto or desirable trait; it means "pleasantness". It was used by the dukes of Brittany from at least 1451 to 1500.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Plaisance1450-7FrenchJones
Plesancec. 1500FrenchJones
 

 
Plein Chemin Herald - This French title is a motto in origin, meaning "open road" or "right path"; he served Louis de Bourbon, Admiral of France, according to Froissart.
 

 
Plus Oultre Pursuivant - This Spanish title is derived from a motto, meaning "further beyond;" it was adopted as a motto of the king of Spain in the early sixteenth century. A herald of this title served the king of Spain in the sixteenth century, according to de Ceballos-Escalera.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Plus Oultre1531Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Plus que nulz Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a motto, meaning "more than any other."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Plus que nulz1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Poitou Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the county of Poitou. The county, which had been associated with Aquitaine as an English possession, came back under French royal control by the early thirteenth century. From then it was often used as a title for a junior member of the royal family. George gives this as a period title.
 

 
Pont Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from one of several towns of that name. He served the dukes of Lorraine, according to Adam Even.
 

 
Polanland King of Arms - This Polish title is locative in origin, from the kingdom of Poland, whose kings he served.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Polanland des Köningis von Polan herolde gegeben1402GermanKuczysnki
Pollerlantt. Henry IV (England)EnglishKuczysnki
Poulayne, herault du roy de Poulaine1432Frenchde Gruben
 

 
Pontarlier Pusuivant - This French title is locative, from the town of that name. He was a fifteenth century French herald, according to Spitzparth.
 

 
Porc-Espic King of Arms - This This French title is derived from an order name, the Order of the Porcupine, which was founded in 1394 by the Duke of Orleans (son of the king of France). Contamine also gives it as Porc Espy in 1435.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Porc-Espic1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Portcullis Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge. According to Chesshyre & Ailes (1986), this title was instituted by Henry VII, he has remained a pursuivant in ordinary since then.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Porcolious1520EnglishJerdan
Portcolis, pursuivant-at-arms1531-2EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Portcolewse1533EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Portcolles pursuivant1543EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Portcullis1599EnglishGodfrey
Portcolloys1605EnglishThynne
Portculleys1605EnglishThynne
Portcullis1605EnglishThynne
Purculyus Pusyuvant1532/3English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
nomen vulgariter Portcullis1588LatinWagner HoE
 

 
Portsmouth Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. Franklyn & Tanner say "an extraordinary office, created in 1604, and filled by John Guillim, the famous author of A Display of Heraldry."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Portesmouth1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Portugal King of Arms - This Portuguese title is locative in origin; like many other titles from Iberia, the main king of arms titles are based on kingdom names. Farinha Franco says that this title was the main Portuguese king of arms in the sixteenth century.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Portugal, rey de armas1434SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Potence Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin. He was at the Congress of Arras in 1435, according to Contamine.
 

 
Preußen King of Arms - This German title is locative in origin, deriving from the German form of Prussia. Prussia didn't exist as a duchy until 1525; it's not clear if this title postdates that creation, but it seems likely. Previously it was a region within the Teutonic Knights' Ordenstaat. Kuczysnki gives this title as Preussenland, but does not firmly date it. Brzustowicz and Stevenson give it as Preusserland in 1439, though it is not clear if the spelling is modernized.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
PreußenunclearGermanParavicini
 

 
Priczay Pursuivant - This French title means "prince." He served the seigneurs of Rays in 1437 according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Provence Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the county in southern France. Provence came to be a French royal possession in 1481.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Provence1469Frenchde Merindol
 

 
Purchase Pursuivant - This title is derived from a byname which R&W (s.n. Purchas) gloss as derived from an Old French word meaning "pursuit, pillage" and say was used for "messengers and couriers." Franklyn & Tanner say "was carrying documents for the Crown in 1439, and the year following was attached to the English embassy in France." Godfrey dates last usage to 1447. Also spelled Perchesse.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Purchace the Pursuivantt. Henry VIEnglishBardsley (s.n. Purchas)
 

 
Quesnoit Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Qui que le vueille Pursuivant - This French title is a motto in origin, meaning "Whoever wants it." A pursuivant of this title served the constable of Brittany from 1431-58, according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Qui vouldra Pursuivant - This French title is a motto in origin, meaning "who will want it." It was used as a motto by Philip the Fair. A pursuivant of this title came with Philip the Fair to Spain, according to Domínguez Casas.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Qui Vouldra1500FrenchDomínguez Casas
 

 
Rasyn Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge; racine or rasyn means root, hence stock. Franklyn & Tanner say "in the service of John, Duke of Bedford, in 1435. Named from the eradicated (q.v.) stock badge. Also spelt 'Racine'." Godfrey dates use of this title from 1422 to 1435.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Rasyne1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Ray Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the placename Raiz. In 1430, this herald served the marshall of Raiz.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Raye the pursuivant1542EnglishGairdner and Brodie
 

 
Rennes Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin; Rennes was a substantial town and sometimes capital of Brittany, whose duke he served.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Dinan poursivant a present nomme Rennes1450-7FrenchJones
 

 
Renty Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Renty15th c.FrenchSpitzparth
 

 
Restre Pursuivant - This Spanish title is a derived from a heraldic charge, the rustre (the charge is also spelled rrustre in period Spanish documents).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Restrebefore 1510SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Rethel Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the county of that name (which had become a possession of the dukes of Burgundy). He served Antoine de Bourg, but later the dukes of Burgundy, according to Schnerb.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Rethel1405FrenchSchnerb
Retel le hairault1411FrenchSchnerb
 

 
Richmond Herald (English) - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title (the earls and later dukes of Richmond). Chesshyre & Ailes (1986) say that between 1421 and 1485 this title was used as a herald to the dukes and earls holding the Honour of Richmond. From 1485 to 1510, it was a English royal King of Arms. Since 1510, it was a herald in Ordinary in the College of Arms.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Richemount1520EnglishJerdan
Richeemond harould1530sEnglishGodfrey
a herald with the title of Richmount1536EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Richemont herald1544EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Richmond herald1544EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Richemond1605EnglishThynne
Richemont Herauld1605EnglishThynne
Richemont1522-36English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Richmond alias Clarencieulx1595English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
 

 
Richmond Herald (French) - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. The title Richmond was also used in Brittany. The dukes of Brittany held the English title of earl (later duke) of Richmond for much of the fourteenth century and continued to claim it after the English began to use it as a royal title.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Richemond1337FrenchJones
Richemont1457-8FrenchJones
 

 
Riplemonde Pursuivant - This French pursuivant is locative in origin, from the castle of that name. He presumably served the dukes of Burgundy. He accompanied Philip the Fair to Spain, where he is reported in 1497.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Ruplemonde1440FrenchSpitzparth
Riplemonde1497FrenchDomínguez Casas
 

 
Risebank Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from the name of a fortification in Calais, which was an English possession. Franklyn & Tanner say "a garrison officer of arms; named from the Risban barbican of Calais." Godfrey dates use of this titled from 1501 to 1554, and indicates it lapsed at the loss of Calais.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Riseban1536EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Ryseban1536EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Risbanck1536EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Risebanke1605EnglishThynne
Ryse bancke1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Rivers Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained in the service of the Earl Rivers, 1466."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Rivers Pursevaunt1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Rivez King of Arms - This German title is locative in origin, from one of several places called Rives; D'Escouchy describes him as officer of arms of the Holy Roman Emperor.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Le Roy d'armes de Rivez1451FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Rohan Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a title. He served the Viscounts of Rohan in the mid 15th c., according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Romarin Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin; it literally means "rosemary." He served the count of Anjou or one of his vassals, according to de Merindol.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Romarin1435FrenchChartier
Romarin le poursuivant1446Frenchde Merindol
 

 
Romreich Herald or King of Arms - This German title is locative in origin; it means "Roman realm." Fox-Davies lists this herald in passing as belonging to the Empire.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Romreich1486GermanParavicini
 

 
Rosavante Pursuivant - This Spanish title is unclear in origin; it is probably a motto from a devisa. Literally it could be taken to mean "wise rose."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Rrosavantebefore 1510SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Rose Herald - This English title is presumably derived from a heraldic charge, the rose (possibly a reference to the Tudor rose, as opposed to the existing York and Lancastrian based titles). Franklyn & Tanner say this "seems to have been a sort of temporary name of office employed during the XVI century, and frequently confused with both Rose Blanche and Rose Rouge." Godfrey dates use of the title from 1553 to 1611.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Rose herald1553EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Rose Rouge Pursuivant - This Englis title is derived from a heraldic charge, the red rose badge of Lancaster. Godfrey says that this title came into use in 1602 as an extraordinary title.
 

 
Rosien Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Ross Herald - This Scottish title is locative in origin, derived from the name of an earldom. Franklyn & Tanner say "a name of office formerly employed in Scotland." Wagner and London indicates this title was first used in 1475. This title is currently a filled office at the Court of the Lord Lyon.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Rosse ... heraldis1488Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
Ros'... heraldis1540Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
Ros herald1531ScotsPaul
Ross herald1534ScotsPaul
 

 
Rothesay Herald - This Scottish title is locative in origin, derived from the dukedom conferred to the son of king Robert III in 1398. It is also the name of a castle and the surrounding town. Wagner and London say that this Scottish herald has been from 1398 to present attached to the Lyon Court.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Rothssay and Montros harroldis1488ScotsDSL s.n. Montros
Rothsey1507ScotsPaul
Rothesay herald1533ScotsPaul
Rothsay herald1539ScotsPaul
Rothissay herald1539ScotsPaul
Rotesaye herald1543EnglishGairdner and Brodie
 

 
Rouge Croix Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge, the cross of Saint Gorge, a symbol of England. Chesshyre & Ailes (1986) say that the first recorded evidence of this officer in ordinary is in 1418-19; he has remained an officer in ordinary since.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Rouge Croix1419FrenchJones
Rouge Cross1509EnglishGodfrey
Rougecrosse1520EnglishJerdan
Rougecross pursuivant1535EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Rougecrosse1535EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Rouge Crosse pursuivant1546EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Rugecrosse1564EnglishNational Archives
Rugecross1599EnglishGodfrey
Rouge-croix pursuivant1604EnglishGreen
Rougecrosse1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Rouge Dragon Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge, the red dragon badge of Wales. Chesshyre & Ailes (1986) say that this title was created by Henry VII in 1485; he has remained an officer in ordinary since then.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Rougedragon1520EnglishJerdan
Rougedragon pursuivant1538EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Rouchdragon pursuivant1544EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Rouge Dragon pursuivant1546EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Rudgedragon, persevant at armes1551-6EnglishHoby
Rouge Dragon1564EnglishNational Archives
Rooge Dragon1599EnglishGodfrey
Rougedragon1605EnglishThynne
Roche Dragon purcyfant1491ScotsDSL s.n. Roche Dragon
 

 
Roussillon King of Arms - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a region of southern France, which was passed back and forth between Aragon and France through the Middle Ages. A king of arms of that name was mentioned in 1486 according to Jones; the region was part of France at that time.
 

 
Rutland Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Godfrey indicates he served the Earl of Rutland from 1394-1395.
 

 
Ruyers King of Arms - This German title is locative in origin, referring to the western regions of the Holy Roman Empire, which often meant the areas that today we call the Netherlands. Most citations of it are preceded by another heraldic title, which I have omitted for space and clarity (see Gelre and Österreich for examples).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Armorum rex de ruyrisc. 1400Latin (Dutch?)Adam Even
regis de Ruyeris1409Latin (Dutch)Verbij-Schillings
Beyeren, quondam Gelre, armorum regis de Ruyeris1409Latin (Dutch)Verbij-Schillings
roy de Ruyers1407FrenchVerbij-Schillings
roi d'armes de Ruyers1449Frenchvan Anrooij King
le roy d'armes des Royers1450Frenchvan Anrooij
le roy de Royer1476Frenchvan Anrooij King
dit Juiliers, roy des Royers1477Frenchvan Anrooij King
coninck van den Ruyeren1362Dutchvan Anrooij King
coninx van den Ruyren1365Dutchvan Anrooij King
coninx van den Ruwyren1367Dutchvan Anrooij King
coninc van den wapenender Ruyeren1411DutchVerbij-Schillings
Louvain, coninc vander Ruwieren1429Dutchvan Anrooij King
coninck van den herauden of van den Royeren1467Dutchvan Anrooij King
ein Conig der wappen in Ruwir des Heiligh Romisch Rych1422-61Germanvan Anrooij
konig der wappen von Ruifir1422-61Germanvan Anrooij
de Ruir rex armorum1433-7Latin (German)van Anrooij King
Sancti Romani Imperii de Ruir rex armorumc. 1437Latin (German)van Anrooij
Rex de ruris1440Latin (German)Paravicini
armarum rex de Ruwier1440Latin (German)van Anrooij
Rex de Ruwier1440Latin (German)van Anrooij King
 

 
Saine Ville Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town known today as Sainville. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Saint Pol Herald - This French title is locative in nature, derived from a noble title. Wagner HoE lists this herald as being in service to the Count of St. Pol at a period tournament which he was unable to more firmly date. This is presumably Loius de Luxembourg, who died in 1475.
 

 
Saintonge Herald - This French title is locative in nature, from the region in northwest France. George dates it to period.
 

 
Saint-Aubin Pursuivant - This French title is probably locative in origin (from Saint Aubin du Cormier). A pursuivant of this title served the dukes of Brittany in the mid fifteenth century.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
St-Aubin1450-7FrenchJones
Saint-Aubin t. Pierre II (Brittany)FrenchJones Revue
 

 
Saint Jud Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin, but is probably locative. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Salins Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the lordship of that name, which was sold to the dukes of Burgundy in the thirteenth century. A pursuivant with this title travelled with Philip the Fair in 1506, according to Domínguez Casas.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Salins1446FrenchSpitzparth
Salines1545Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Salisbury Herald - This heraldic title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "in the service of the Earl of Salisbury (c. 1375)." Godfrey indicates this title was in use from 1388.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Salisbury herald1388EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Samaiten Herald - This German title is locative in origin, referring to a region of modern Lithuania (Samogitia) which was being fought over at this time.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Samaiten14th c.GermanParavicini
 

 
Samur Pursuivant - This French title is locative in nature, derived from the castle of that name which belonged to the dukes of Anjou, who laid claim to Sicily. This title was used in Sicily in 1437-8, according to Jones.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Saumur1437FrenchJones
 

 
Sanglier Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a charge (a boar); this herald served the dukes of Brittany in the mid-fifteenth century according to Jones. It's unclear who used this badge or device.
 

 
Sanqueria Herald - This Spanish title is unclear in origin; he served the kings of Navarre in 1610 according to George.
 

 
Sans Faillir Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a motto, meaning "without fail"; a pursuivant of this title served the son of the duke of Brittany in 1432-3, according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Sans Repose Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a motto meaing "without rest." Godfrey indicates this title dates from 1434.
 

 
Santarem Pursuivant - This Portuguese title is locative in origin, from a city in central Portugal. Farinha Franco says that this herald was subordinate to Portugal King of Arms.
 

 
Savoy King of Arms - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. He served the dukes of Savoy, according to Mathieu.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Savoie, rex heraudorum1368Latin (French)Paviot
[name], dit savoy le heyraud1431FrenchPaviot
Savoy, roy d'armes1522FrenchMathieu
Savoye, roy d'armes1522FrenchMathieu
 

 
Scales Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained by the Earl Rivers who was also Lord Scales in right of his wife. Scales was taken prisoner in 1475 and his papers read by King Louis XI, who was no respecter of the rules of chivalry."
 

 
Schoenhoven Herald - This French title is locative in origin. Adam Even dates this herald to 1368 as a herald of Jean de Blois; he was overlord of Schoenhoven. Verbij-Schillings dates this as Shoonhoven to about 1400, though it's not clear if this was the c. 1400 spelling. Modern Schoonhoven is in the Netherlands.
 

 
Secret Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a motto or desirable trait. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained by Sir John Falstaf, 1425; also spelt 'Segret'."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Segret1425EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Senestre Pursuivant - This French heraldic title is unclear in origin; it means "left," and is used in common use and in heraldic terminology. He served the seigneur of Castelbon, according to Schnerb.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Senestre, poursivant d'armes du seigneur de Castelbon1411FrenchSchnerb
 

 
Serreshall Pursuivant - This English title is locative in nature. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained in the service of Sir Richard Monfort, Deputy Lieutenant of Calais (c. 1500)."
 

 
Sessaulx Pursuivant - This French title is probably locative in origin, from a place which often appears as Sesseau. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine.
 

 
Sevilla [Herald] - This Spanish title is locative in origin, derived from the city of that name. He served the kings of Castilla, according to Velde.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Sevilla1548SpanishFernández de Oviedo
 

 
Shrewsbury Herald or Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "a name of office applied, with the ascent of King Henry IV, to the officer of arms in the service of Dunbar, Scots Earl of March (1403). In 1442 John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, maintained an officer of arms who may have been known as Shrewsbury as well as Talbot Herald." The Earl of March was in exile in England when using this herald.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Johannes Shrouesbury heraud1404EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Sicilia Herald - This Spanish title is locative in origin, derived from the kingdom of Sicily, which was ruled by Aragon. Friar gives this as a title used by Aragon and Sicily. Franklyn & Tanner say that Jean de Courtais (ob. 1435), who originated the term 'false heraldry' held this title.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Sicilia, lo heraut d'armes1409CatalanRiquer Castellana
Sicille, herault1425FrenchWagner H&H
Cecille1435FrenchChartier
Seçilia1548SpanishFernández de Oviedo
 

 
Sicile King of Arms - A herald of this title served Rene le Bon, who claimed (largely unsuccessfully) the throne of Sicily. Riquer Castellana establishes clearly that this is a different herald than the one who served Aragon.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Sicile son heraut1446Frenchde Merindol
Sicile, roy d'arms d'Anjou1447FrenchRiquer Catalana
Sicilia, rey d'armas1479SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Sidonia Herald - This Spanish title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. This herald served the dukes of Medina Sidonia, according to de Ceballos-Escalera.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Sidonia1502Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
El Nuncio Sidonia1502Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Sjælland Pursuivant - This Scandinavian title is locative in nature, derived from the name of the Danish island of Sjælland; de Ceballos-Escalera gives this as the form of the title. Nissen makes clear that this is the same herald whom Friar identifies as a "European officer of arms," as he met the future Henry IV in the 1390s. Friar gives this as a period title for a European officer of arms, as he met the future Henry IV in the 1390s.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Seyland, herald of Denmark1507ScotsPaul
 

 
Slains Pursuivant - This Scottish title is locative in origin, derived from the name of a castle belonging to the Earls of Errol, who are the hereditary holders of the office of Lord High Constable of Scotland. Franklyn & Tanner say "an officer of arms maintained by the Lord High Constable of Scotland." Wagner and London indicate that title was first used in 1404. It was revived in modern times and is currently in use.
 

 
Snowdoun Herald - This Scottish title is locative in origin, derived from the name of a royal castle. Franklyn & Tanner say "a name of office formerly employed in Scotland...." While not currently occupied, this title is available should a new herald choose it.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Smowden [sic], herroude to ye King of Scotes1472EnglishMED s.n. pursevant
Snawdoun' ... heraldis1488Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
Snawdoune [harrald]1543Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
Snawdoun herold1502, 1541ScotsPaul
 

 
Somerset Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Chesshyre & Ailes (1986) say he first appears as a private herald to the Duke of Somerset in 1448-49, and is a royal herald from circa 1485 to 1525. A private herald again for the Duke of Somerset from 1525 to 1536, he became a royal herald in ordinary in 1536, and remains so today.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Somerset the herald1542EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Somerset herald1545EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Sommersett, heralt at armes1553-6EnglishHoby
Somersett herauld1562EnglishNichols
Somersett1605EnglishThynne
Somerset1586English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
 

 
Sotomayor Herald - This Spanish title is locative in origin, from the town of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Sotomayort. Felipe IISpanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Soucy Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from one of several towns of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Soussie le poursievant1451FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Stafford Herald - This English title is locative in origin, from a noble title. Wagner and London date the existence of this officer to 1355, and suggest that he was the officer of arms to Ralph Stafford, Earl of Stafford.
 

 
Suchenwirt Herald - This German title is a byname in origin (it means "seek the innkeeper"). Fox-Davies lists this herald in passing as belonging to Austria; other sources give many details about Peter Suchenwirt, who was herald to the dukes of Austria (d. 1395). However, it is not completely clear to me if this is a title or if it is his personal byname.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Suchenwirt14th c.GermanParavicini
 

 
Suffolk Herald - This English title is locative in origin, from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say this herald was "maintained, XIV to XV centuries, by both Earls and dukes of Suffolk. In early XVIII century [it] was revived as name of office of an officer extraordinary. Godfrey dates use of this title from 1385-1452, 1517-1522, and from 1707-1776.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Suffolk heraulde1530sEnglandGodfrey
Suffolke Herauld1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Sully Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. A herald of this title served the constable of France in 1410, according to Adam Even.
 

 
Sweden King of Arms - This Scandinavian title is locative in origin, derived from the name of the kingdom. The title is given as Sverige by de Ceballos-Escalera.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Sweden1380sDutchNijsten
 

 
Swethe Pursuivant - This German title is unclear in origin.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Swethe1390-3EnglishStretton
 

 
Talant Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin; Talant is a castle in the Duchy of Burgundy. A pursuivant of this title is at the Congress of Arras in 1435.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Jaquet de la Rouelle, dit Talant, poursivant d'armes dudit seigneur1410FrenchSchnerb
Talant, poursivant dudit seigneur1411FrenchSchnerb
Tallent1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Talbot Herald - This English title is derived from a family name. Franklyn & Tanner say that "In 1442 John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury, maintained an officer of arms who may have been known as Shrewsbury as well as Talbot Herald." I think it likely that they were two distinct heralds.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Talbot1453FrenchAdam Even
 

 
Taudes Herald - This French title is unclear in origin. He was at the 1435 Congress of Arras, according to Contamine. The name may also appear as Barghes, in which case it is locative in origin.
 

 
Tavira Pursuivant - This Portuguese title is locative in origin; it is a town in southern Portugal. Farinha Franco dates it to period but gives no other details.
 

 
Teste de Fer Pursuivant - This Spanish title is derived from a family name or nickname; it means "iron head." He served the kings of Navarra or a vassal, according to Narbona Cárceles.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
[name] Teste de Fer1385French Narbona Cárceles
 

 
Thury Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from a lordship. Franklyn & Tanner say "in the service of Sir John Salveyn, Bailiff and Justicar of Rouen during the second quarter of the XV century. The name is derived from the Thury Lordship in Normandy of which, it seems, Sir John was seized. Also spelt 'Tury.'" Godfrey dates use of this title from 1428-1471.
 

 
Toison d'Or King of Arms - This French title is derived from an order name, the Burgundian Toison d'Or or Golden Fleece. Franklyn & Tanner say "a king of arms created c. 1420 by the Duke of Burgundy."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Roy d'armes, Thoison d'or1431FrenchLe Fèvre
Roy darmes de la Thoison dor1431FrenchLe Fèvre
Thoison d'Or, roy d'armes1432Frenchde Gruben
Toison d'Or, herault du thoison d'or de monseigneur le duc1432Frenchde Gruben
Thoison d'Or, herault de l'ordre de la thoison d'or1433Frenchde Gruben
Le roy d'armes de la Thoison d'or1433FrenchLe Fèvre
Thoison d'orc. 1436FrenchRoemheld
le roy d'armes de la Thoison d'or1449FrenchNarbona Cárceles
Le Roy d'armes que ladicte Toizon d'Or1451FrenchD'Escouchy
le roy d'armes de la thoison d'or1452Frenchde Gruben
Roi d'arms Toison d'Or1454FrenchRoemheld
dudit Thoison1460FrenchSpitzparth
Thoison1461Frenchde Gruben
Dit Thoyson d'Or1539FrenchDomínguez Casas
Toison de Oro1517SpanishDomínguez Casas
Tauson d'Oro1519SpanishRiquer Castellana
Thoyson d'Or1543EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Thoyson1543EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Thoison d'Or1543EnglishGairdner and Brodie
 

 
Toledo King of Arms - This Spanish title is locative in origin, derived from the city name. He served the kings of Castilla by at least 1442, according to Velde.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Toledo, rey d'armas1442SpanishRiquer Castellana
Rey de Armas del Reyno de Toledo1506Spanishde Ceballos-Escalera
 

 
Tornay Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town which is today in Belgium (Tournai).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Tournay1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Torner Herald - This French title is unclear, but is probably a family name in origin; alternately, it may be an error for Tournay.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Torner1411FrenchNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Torraine Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. The county of Touraine (as it is spelled in English today) became part of the French crown's holdings in the thirteenth century. George dates to period.
 

 
Torrington Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from the town of that name. Franklyn & Tanner say "(c. 1430) maintained by Earl of Huntington, Duke of Exeter, and named from the town in Devon on the Earl's estate."
 

 
Toulouse Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the lordship of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Toulongeon le heraultc. 1492Frenchde la Marche
 

 
Toulouse Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the town in southern France. The county of Toulouse passed to the Crown of France in the thirteenth century.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Toulouse1401French or SpanishNarbona Cárceles
 

 
Toutain Pursuivant - This French title is unclear in origin, but appears to be derived from a family name. It is possible that it was actually combined with Le Gras as Toutain le Gras. He appeared at the Congress of Arras, according to Contamine and Russell.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Toutain1435FrenchRussell
 

 
Toutseal Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a motto (meaning "all alone"). He is mentioned (in Austria) as a herald from Brittany in 1432 or 1433, according to Jones.
 

 
Trastamara Herald - This Spanish title is locative in origin, derived from the dynastic name of the kings of Castilla after 1369. It had previously been a title for a member of the royal family.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Tarastamara, faraute1429SpanishRiquer Castellana
Trastamara1453SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Trinacria King of Arms - This Spanish title is locative, derived from a name for Sicily. He served the kings of Aragon, who ruled southern Italy. Perthanay in the citation below appears to be a personal byname rather than another title.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Perthanay, alias Trinacria nuncupato, regi armorum1409Latin (Catalan)Riquer Castellana
 

 
Tudello Herald - This French title is locative in origin, probably derived from the city in Navarre more normally called Tudela. George dates it to period.
 

 
Tyger Pursuivant - This English title is derived from a heraldic charge. Godfrey indicates that this pursuivant was used by William Lord Hastings in c. 1477.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Tygyr Pursevant1477EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Ulster King of Arms - This English title is locative in origin, from the region in Ireland. Godrey indicates that from 1552-1558 this was an English officer of arms. Thereafter (from other sources, this office was moved to Dublin where it remained an Irish office until 1943. In 1943 it was returned to England and attached to Norroy KoA, giving the new office title as "Norroy and Ulster King of Arms."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Uluester Kinge of Armesbetween 1568-1600EnglishWagner H&H
Ulster now King of Heralds in Ireland1605EnglishThynne
Ulster Kinge of Arms1607EnglishWagner H&H
 

 
Ungarn Herald - This German title is locative in origin, derived from the German name for the kingdom of Hungary. The German form of the heraldic title is given as Ungerland by van Anrooij and Kuczysnki, but neither gives a dated period spelling. Ungerland seems, however, consistent with period forms of other titles.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Hongrie1453FrenchSpitzparth
 

 
Unicorn Pursuivant - This Scottish title is derived from the name of a heraldic charge. A unicorn has long been used as a royal badge in Scotland.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Unicorn signifer Regis1445Latin (Scots)DSL s.n. Signifer(e)
Unicorne signifero nostro1475Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
Unicorne'... signiferis1488Latin (Scots)Brown et al.
Vnicorne pursyfant1473-4ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Vnicorne herald1474ScotsDSL s.n. Unicorn
Ormond, Kintyre and Unicorne pursewantis1542-3ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
Unicorn and Ilay pursyphantis1548ScotsDSL s.n. Pursevant
his office of Vnicorne pursevandschip1570ScotsDSL s.n. pursevandschip
 

 
Valencia King of Arms - This Spanish title is locative in origin, from the Kingdom of Valencia. Valencia was always subordinated to the kingdom of Aragon, whose king this herald served.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Valencia, rey d'armes1445CatalanRiquer Catalana
Valencia1445-7SpanishRiquer Castellana
Valençia1548SpanishFernández de Oviedo
 

 
Vaillant King of Arms - This English title is derived from a motto or desirable trait; it means "valliant;" this is a standard Middle English form. Franklyn & Tanner say "(c. 1350) a not very well authenticated office, no province being on record as under Vaillant's jurisdiction." Godfrey dates usage of Vaillant KoA to 1354-c.1400.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Le Roy Vaillant heraud1395English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Vaillant nostre heraut1400English or Anglo-FrenchGodfrey
 

 
Valay Pursuivant - This French title is locative in nature, from the town of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Vallay le poursievant1451FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Valois Herald - This French title is locative in origin, derived from the dynastic name of the kings of France and dukes of Burgundy. George dates this title to period.
 

 
Vanda Pursuivant - This Spanish title is derived from an Order name (more frequently spelled Banda). It means "band" (in a general sense) or "bend" (in the heraldic sense). Both senses were intended.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Vanda1434SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Vannes Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin; Vannes was a substantial town in Brittany, whose duke he served.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Vannes1450-7FrenchJones
 

 
Vaudemont Herald or Pursuivant - This Fench title is locative in nature, derived from a family name. The House of Vaudemont became dukes of Lorraine in the late fifteenth century; this herald served the dukes. In 1525, he was a pursuivant, according to Adam Even.
 

 
Vendôme Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the county of that name. He was on a mission for the king of France in 1482-3, according to Jones, though he probably served the counts of Vendôme.
 

 
Veritat Pursuivant - This Spanish title is a motto in origin; it means "truth" in Catalan. Riquer Catalana dates it to period (probably c. 1500).
 

 
Vermandois Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from the regional name. Vermandois was originally a county which became a royal possession. George dates this title to period.
 

 
Verrey Pursuivant - This title is probably French (though may be English) and is locative in origin, from the French town of that name. Franklyn & Tanner say "known only as one who accompanied a herald carrying letters to the Duke of Brittany in 1468."
 

 
Verswig es nit Herald - This German title is derived from a motto, meaning "don't hide it" or "don't keep quiet about it."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Verswig es nit1389GermanParavicini
 

 
Vertus Pursuivant - This French title is derived from a motto, meaning "truth"; it was used by the dukes of Brittany from at least 1473 to 1500, according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Viana Herald - This Spanish title is locative in origin, deriving from a title (prince of Viane) belonging to the kings of Navarra, according to Ochoa & Ramos. It appears both as Viane and Viana (the first a French or Catalan influenced spelling, the second a Spanish or Latin influenced spelling).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Viana Le heraut1439FrenchNarbona Cárceles
Viana heraut del seynor princep1440Spanish Narbona Cárceles
 

 
Vignolles Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, from the town of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Vignolles1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Villalobos Herald - This Spanish title is locative in nature, derived from the town of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
faraute Villalobos1434SpanishRiquer Castellana
 

 
Villebon Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, from a French town of that name. Franklyn & Tanner say "known to have served under Maine Herald in 1449."
 

 
Villiers Herald - This French title is locative in origin, from one of several locations of that name.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Villiers1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Voit qui Peult Pursuivant - This French title is a motto in origin, meaning "let him who can, see"
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Voit qui peult1435FrenchChartier
 

 
Volant King of Arms - This English title is derived from a motto or desirable trait, rather than the heraldic posture (which is not found before the sixteenth century). In Middle English, volante means will or desire (the same root as voluntary). Most English scholars argue that this title is probably a variant for Vaillant; I lean toward this notion that it's independent. Franklyn & Tanner say "(c. 1350) a not very well authenticated office, no province being on record as under Vaillant's jurisdiction. Also spelt 'Volant', unless this last was a separate name of office of another equally ill-defined king of arms." This, however, is based on a post-fourteenth century notion of what kings of arms do.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Volant, [King of Heralds]1354English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
 

 
Vorne Herald - This French title is unclear in origin. He was at the Congress of Arras in 1435, according to Contamine.
 

 
Vostre Vueil Pursuivant - This French title is a motto in origin, meaing "your will."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Vostre Vueil1435FrenchRussell
 

 
Vouvant Pursuivant - This French title is locative in origin, derived from a possession of the duke of Brittany. He served the Constable Richemont in 1443, according to Jones Signes.
 

 
Vray Desir Pursuivant - This French title is a motto in origin, meaning "true desire."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Vray Desir1435FrenchRussell
Vray-Desir le pousievant1451FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Vrieslant Herald - This Dutch title is locative in origin, from the region of that name (English Friesland).
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Vrieslant den heraut1404DutchVerbij-Schillings
 

 
Wales Herald - This English heraldic title is locative in origin, derived from a princely title traditionally given to the heir to the English throne. Franklyn & Tanner say "a name of office employed during the last decade of the XIV century and revived as an 'extraordinary,' 1963." Godfrey indicates that this title was created in 1393.
 

 
Wallingford Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from the name of a castle. Franklyn & Tanner say "may have been in the service of Kings Henry V and VI, but cannot be authenticated before 1489. Wallingford Castle, from which the name derives, was the property of the Prince of Wales, as Duke of Cornwall, till the thirty-first regnal year of King Henry VIII."
 

 
Wark Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived frorm the name of a castle. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained (1454) by Lord Grey of Powis who held Wark Castle, Northumberland; also spelt 'Werk.'"
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Werk1454EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Warwick Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained during the first half of the XV century by the earls of Warwick." Godfrey dates use of this title to 1435-1469.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Warwicke Herauld1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Wexford Pursuivant - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say "maintained by John Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury and Waterford, who was styled Earl of Wexford. Wexford brought dispatches home from overseas in 1430. Also spelt 'Waysford'." Godfrey dates the bringing of dispatches to 1436.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Waysford1436EnglishGodfrey
 

 
Willeborde Pursuivant - This French pursuivant is unclear in origin; it may well be derived from a Dutch family name. He accompanied Philip the Fair to Spain, where he is reported in 1497.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Willeborde1497FrenchDomínguez Casas
 

 
Windsor Herald - This English title is locative in nature, after the castle belonging to the kings of English (and also used as a royal byname by Edward III, who was king when this title was created. Chesshyre & Ailes (1986) say that this title was created as a royal herald in the mid-fourteenth century (the 1364 citation below is the first clear appearance, though it may not be the first creation of a herald of this title). He became a herald in ordinary in 1418-19, and remains so today.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Hiraut nommet Windesore1364English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Wyndesore herralde1472EnglishMED s.n. herad
One of the kings herolds called Wyndsore1485EnglishAttreed
Wyndsore1520EnglishJerdan
Windsor herald1531EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Windsour herauld1562EnglishNichols
Windesor Heraulde1476 [1605]EnglishThynne
Windesore1605EnglishThynne
Windsore1605EnglishThynne
Winsore1605EnglishThynne
 

 
Wittenberg Herald - This German title is locative in nature, from the town of that name. He served the duke of Silesia, according to Kuczysnki.
 

 
Worcester Herald - This English title is locative in origin, derived from a noble title. Franklyn & Tanner say that he was "in the service of John Tiptoft, Earl of Worcester, mid-fifteenth century." Godfrey dates use of this title to 1464.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Worcester Heraulde1605EnglishThynne
 

 
York Herald - This English title is locative in origin, from the royal duchy of York. Chesshyre & Ailes (1986) say that the first reliable written evidence of this officer is in 1484, though it may have existed a century earlier. He has remained a royal herald in ordinary since then.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
York herald1531EnglishGairdner and Brodie
Yorcke1605EnglishThynne
Yorke1605EnglishThynne
Yorke Herald1586English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
Yorke Heraulte1586English or Anglo-FrenchWagner H&H
 

 
Zuillant Pursuivant - This French title is of locative origin, from the county of Zeeland, which was a possession of the counts of Hainault. It passed to the dukes of Burgundy in 1436 and thence to the Holy Roman Empire (in 1477). Schnerb gives it as Zeelande, and suggests this is a period spelling (presumably French and 15th century), but does not more firmly date it.
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Seland1390-3EnglishStretton
Zuillant1435FrenchChartier
Zuilland le pousievant1451FrenchD'Escouchy
 

 
Zyt vor zyt Herald - This German title is derived from a motto, meaning "time after time."
 
DATED FORM:DATE:LANGUAGE:SOURCE:
Zyt vor zyt1434GermanParavicini


HTML editing by Kathleen M. O'Brien.

Medieval Scotland | Medieval Names Archive | Heraldic Titles from the Middle Ages and Renaissance


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