Names of English Colleges

by Mari Elspeth nic Bryan (Kathleen M. O'Brien) and Juliana de Luna (Julia Smith)


© 2004-2007 by Kathleen M. O'Brien and Julia Smith. All rights reserved.
Version 1.4, updated 19 November 2007


Names of Colleges

Below, we give the names of several dozen colleges and other schools, categorized by naming pattern. Where available, we give period citations of the name.

Names of Saints: Other religious references
(Names of the Trinity and feasts):
Founders - King/Queen: Founders - Titles: Founders - Surnames:
Placenames: Architectural Names: Corporate Groups:
Other: Unknown:

A list of sources is included on another page.

Abbotts Hall (in Westmorland)

From Speed. We were unable to confirm that this location still exists.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Abbotts Hallc. 1610Speed (p. 182, map of city of Kendale)
Note: this map is undated, but most maps in this source dated 1610

All Soules College (in Oxfordshire)

This college was founded in 1437, and named for the feast of All Souls. One story states that it was dedicated specifically to those who had died in the wars in France.
http://www.all-souls.ox.ac.uk/
http://www.socsci.kun.nl/ped/whp/histeduc/clough/gben007.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Collegii Animarum Omnium Fidelium Defunctorum in Oxon.1466Stonor (p. 176, document 84 (Latin), dated 1466)
Collegii Animarum Omnium Fidelium Defunctorum in Oxon.1466Stonor (p. 176, document 84 (Latin), dated 1466)
Animarum Omnium Fidelium defunctorum in Oxon.1466Stonor (p. 179, document 85 (Latin), dated 1466)
collegio Animarum Omnium Fidelium defunctorum in Oxon.1466Stonor (p. 179, document 85 (Latin), dated 1466)
collegio Animarum Omnium Fidelium defunctorum in Oxon.1466Stonor (p. 179, document 85 (Latin), dated 1466)
All sowles colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
All Soules Colledge1605Speed (p. 146, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1437" on label
All Soules Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, inset listing places in city)
All Soules Colledge1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. All Sovles Colledge 1437)

Balliol College (in Oxfordshire)

Traditionally this college was stated to have been founded in 1263, with statutes dated 1282. It was named for its founder, John Balliol.
http://web.balliol.ox.ac.uk/history/history/index.asp
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Bally College in Oxon.1482?Stonor (p. 179, document 85 (Latin), dated 1 May [1482?])
Baylie colledge, or Baitioll colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Balliol Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1263" on label
Balliol Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, inset listing places in city)

The Bedford School (in Bedfordshire)

The Bedford School, founded 1548, endowed 1566.
http://www.bedfordcharity.org.uk/about/history.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
The Schole1610Speed (p. 35, inset of "Bedford")

Benett College (in Cambridgeshire)

Named for Saint Benet (Benedict), this was another name for Corpus Christi College. It was so known because St. Benet's church served as the college chapel. (Taylor, p. 96)
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/03211a.htm
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Bennet Colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Benett Coll [abbreviation]1574Taylor (p. 96, map dated to 1574)

Birmingham Grammar School (in Birminghamshire)

Birmingham Grammar School, founded by King Edward VI.
Founded in 1552 by King Edward VI, this school was named for its location in Birmingham. It was also known as King Edward's School.
http://www.socsci.kun.nl/ped/whp/histeduc/clough/gben007.html

Bishop Trellick's Hall (in Oxfordshire)

Bishop Trellick's Hall was one of Oxford's earliest halls, founded in the thirteenth century. Later it was known as New Inn Hall. It is presumably named for its founder.
http://www.spc.ox.ac.uk/history/index.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
New Inne now in the tenure of New Colledge heretofore called Turlokes Inne1622Scot (Oxford) (last entry on second page)

Blacke Hall (in Oxfordshire)

: A 1622 document says that this existed on the site of Brasenose College before its founding in 1515. This name was probably based on the color of the building, but a surname origin cannot be dismissed.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Blacke Hall1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Brasen-Nose Coll. 1515)

Brasenose College (in Oxfordshire)

Brasenose Hall existed by the 1330s; it was constituted as a college in 1512. The name is probably derived from "brass nose", a name said to have been derived from a brass door knocker in the shape of a nose. The story goes that in the 1330s a group of rebellious students moved from Oxford to Stamford in Lincolnshire; one of the ringleaders was from Brasenose Hall. In due course the students returned to Oxford. The college website says: "In 1890 a house in Stamford was offered for sale; it was called 'Brasenose', and had an ancient door knocker, dated to the twelfth century. Brasenose College purchased the house for the sake of that door knocker, which was brought to Oxford and now hangs over the high table in Brasenose Hall. The College historians of the 1890s were convinced that the fourteenth century students of Brasenose Hall took the knocker from which they derived their name to Stamford, and that it had been restored to its rightful home at last."
http://www.bnc.ox.ac.uk/history/his/page4.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Barasenose in Oxonia1517Inclosures (vol. I, p. 384 (Latin))
Brasen nose colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Brasenose Colledge1605Speed (p. 146, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1513" on label
Brasenose Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, inset listing places in city)
Brasen-Nose Colledge1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Brasen-Nose Coll. 1515)

Brasenase College (in Rutlandshire)

See Brasenose above for a likely etymology. This was the site to which the students moved in the fourteenth century to set up a rival university.
http://www.localauthoritypublishing.co.uk/councils/stamford/building.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Brasenase coll [likely an abbreviation]c. 1610Speed (p. 151, map of city of Stanford)
Note: this map is undated, but most maps in this source dated 1610

Brodegate Hall (in Oxfordshire)

Broadgates Hall was a part of medieval Oxford, which was replaced by Pembroke College in 1624.
http://www.pmb.ox.ac.uk/about/pembroke_beginning.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Brodegate halle1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
viz. Broadgate Hall was in the tenure of the Priorie and Couent of S. Frideswicke, and had vnder it Nun Hall, Myne Hall [...]1622Scot (Oxford) (last entry on second page)

Buckingham College (in Cambridgeshire)

Sometime between 1472 and 1483, the residence formerly known as Monks Hostel was renamed Buckingham College after a patron, Henry Stafford, Duke of Buckingham. In the 1530s, Buckingham College was abolished as part of the dissolution of the monasteies." The college was refounded in 1542 as Magdalen College. (Taylor, p. 107)
http://www.magd.cam.ac.uk/college/past.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
founded this Colledge by the name of Buckingham Colledge1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Magdalene Coll. 1519)

Canterburie College (in Oxfordshire)

A 1622 document says that this existed on the site of Christes Church College before its founding in 1515. It was named after its founder, Simon Islip, Archbishop of Canterbury. The Catholic Encyclopedia says that the college was endowed before Islipís death in 1366, but that it never became a truly independent college, but was attached to Christ Church.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Canterburie Colledge founded by Simon Islip Archbishop of Canterburie1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Christ Chvrch Coll.)

Cardinal College (in Oxfordshire)

Cardinal College was founded by Thomas Wolsey in 1525. The college was named for his rank as Cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church. The college was recreated as King Henry VIII College, and then as Christ Church College.
http://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/chch/history/cardcoll.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
the name of Cardinals Colledge, where the ancient Monasterie of S. Frideswide had formerly beene situated1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Christ Chvrch Coll.)

Christes Church College (in Oxfordshire)

Founded in 1546, replacing the earlier Cardinal College and King Henry VIII College. The entity Christ Church briefly combined the college and the local parish, explaining the use of the term "church" in the name.
http://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/chch/history/chchfond/h8coll.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Ecclesia Christi Cathedralis Oxon (Latin)1546from charter at
http://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/chch/history/chchfond/h8coll.html
The Cathedrall Churche of Christe1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Christes colledge at Oxford1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Christes Church1605Speed (p. 146, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1546" on label
Christes Church Coll: [abbreviation]1605Speed (p. 147, inset listing places in city)
Collegium Christi ex fundatione Regis Henr. 81622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Christ Chvrch Coll.)

Christes College (in Cambridgeshire)

This college was first established as 1437 as Godshouse, but it remained a relatively impoverished institution. In 1505, Margaret Beaufort gave significant property to the college, and it was refounded and renamed Christ's College.
http://www.christs.cam.ac.uk/quincentenary/campaign/founded.shtml
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
D. Watson, M. of Christes college1563John Foxe's Book of Martyrs
Christes Colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Christs Colledge1610Speed (p. 45, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1505" on label
Christes Colledge1610Speed (p. 45, inset listing places in city)
Christs Coll.1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Christs Coll. 1505)

Christ's Hospital (in London)

Christ's Hospital, known later as Bluecoat School because of the uniform of the students, was founded by Edward VI in 1553. The modern school has moved to Sussex.
http://www.christs-hospital.org.uk/24.html

Clare Hall (in Cambridgeshire)

Clare College was founded in 1326 and endowed a few years later by Elizabeth de Clare (Lady de Burgh). In its founding documents, it is referred to as "the House of the University of Cambridge", but it is referred to by Clare Hall by at least 1339.
http://www.clare.cam.ac.uk/about/history.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
D. Notaris M. of Clerehall1563John Foxe's Book of Martyrs
Clare colledge, or Clare halle1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Clare Hall1574Taylor (p. 106, map dated to 1574)
Clare Hall1592Taylor (p. 94, map dated to 1592)
Clare Hall1610Speed (p. 46, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1326" on label
Clare Hall1610Speed (p. 45, inset listing places in city)
Vniversitie House or Hall, now Clare Hall1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Vniversitie House or Hall, now Clare Hall 1326)
Vniversitie House or Hall1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Vniversitie House or Hall, now Clare Hall 1326)
Clare Hall1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Vniversitie House or Hall, now Clare Hall 1326)

Clement Hostle (in Cambridgeshire)

This college existed at least by the sixteenth century; it is today part of Trinity Hall.
http://www.trinhall.cam.ac.uk/about/history.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
D. Cliffe of Clement hostle1563John Foxe's Book of Martyrs

College (Fotheringay, Northamptonshire)

A college (here a center of ecclesiatical study) was founded at the church at Fotheringay in 1398; it ceased to exist at the Reformation.
http://www.richardiii.net/sites_fotheringhay.htm
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
the Coledge at Foodryngdre13 May 1478Paston (vol. 5, p. 318; document: 930)

Corpus Christi College (in Cambridgeshire)

This college was founded in 1352 by the Guilds of Corpus Christi and the Blessed Virgin Mary. Therefore, it is named only indirectly for the festival of Corpus Christi, and directly for a group of students and teachers.
http://www.corpus.cam.ac.uk/
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Corpus Christi Colledge1610Speed (p. 46, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1344" on label
Corpus Christi Coll: [abbreviation]1610Speed (p. 45, inset listing places in city)
Coll. Cor. Christi1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Coll. Cor. Christi 1331)
the Orchard of Corpus Christi Colledge is now standing1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Gon. & Cai. Colleg. 1353)

Corpus Christi College (in Oxfordshire)

This college was founded in March 1517 by Richard Fox, then Bishop of Winchester. It was presumably named for the feast of Corpus Christi.
http://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/chch/history/cardcoll.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Corpus Christi colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Corpus Christi Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1516" on label
Corpus Chr: Colledge ["Chr:" is an abbreviation]1605Speed (p. 147, inset listing places in city)
Corpus Christi Colledge, in Anno 15161622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Corpvs Christi Coll. 1516

Durham College (in Oxfordshire)

A 1622 document says that this institution was incorporated into Trinitie College at its founding in 1556. It had been founded in about 1350 by Thomas Hatfield, then Bishop of Durham.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
a Colledge called Durham Colledge1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Trinitie Coll. 1556)

Eaton College (in Berkshire)

Eton College was founded in 1440. The original title of the school was "The College of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Eton, beside Windsor," making it the only case of a school named after a location associated with a saint.
http://www.etoncollege.com/default.asp
http://www.socsci.kun.nl/ped/whp/histeduc/clough/gben007.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Eaton colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
the late worthy Warden Sir Hen. Sauill Knight, Proust of Eaton1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Merton Coll. 1274)
[...] hauving been Prouost of Eaton iuxta Windsor1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Magdalene Coll. 1459)

Emanuell College (in Cambridgeshire)

Emmanuel College was founded in 1584, by Sir Walter Mildmay, as a Protestant theological seminary. The name Emanuel is a biblical term referring to Jesus, and was doubtless considered a break with the naming of colleges after saints..
http://www.emma.cam.ac.uk/collegelife/history.cfm?secid=2&itemid=4343
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Emanuel Colledge1610Speed (p. 45, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1584" on label
Emanuell Colledge1610Speed (p. 45, inset listing places in city)
Emanvel Coll.1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Emanvel Coll. 1584)

Exiter College (in Oxfordshire)

Exeter College was founded in 1314 by Walter de Stapeldon, Bishop of Exeter. The name is thus derived from the bishopric he served.
http://www.exeter.ox.ac.uk/about/A-IV-0-BriefHistory.htm
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Excetre College in Oxon.1466Stonor (p. 176, document 84 (Latin), dated 1466)
Excetor colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Excester Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1316" on label
Exiter Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, inset listing places in city)
altered the name thereof, and called it Excester Colledge1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Excester Coll. 1316)

Glocester College (in Oxfordshire)

Gloucester College was a college for Benedictine monks, founded in 1283 and dissolved with the Dissolution of Monasteries in about 1539. The source of the name is unknown, but is presumably from either a surname or title.
http://www.worcester.ox.ac.uk/About%20Worcester/b_collegeHistory.php
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Glocetor colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Glocester Hall was first built by Iohn Lord Gifford for the Monkes of Glocester to studie in [...]1622Scot (Oxford) (last entry on second page)

Godshouse (in Cambridgeshire)

Godshouse was established by William Byngham in 1437 for the training of grammar school masters. However, the college never was well endowed, and was finally refounded under the patronage of Margaret Beaufort as Christ College in 1505.
http://www.christs.cam.ac.uk/quincentenary/campaign/founded.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Gods House1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Christs Coll. 1505)
[...] in or about the places where the Churches of S. Nicholas and S. Iohn Zacharie, S. Augustines Hostle, and Gods House had formerly beene situated.1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Kings Coll. 1441)

Gods House (in Oxfordshire)

 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
the Hospitall of S. Iulian in Southampton, commonly called Gods House1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Qveenes Coll. 1340)

Gonuile & Caius College (in Cambridgeshire)

The College was founded in 1348 by Edmund Gonville. After a period of some decline, the College was refounded and extended in 1557 by John Caius. Caius is a Latinized form of the English surname Keys, and the college name is pronounced as the English surname. This college is unique in that it is named for two individuals (using surnames in each case).
http://www.cai.cam.ac.uk/college/past/index.php
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Gunwell and Caius colledge, or halle1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Gunwell Caius Colledge [written around the edges of the buildings in the map - explaining the missing "and"]1574Taylor (p. 106, map dated to 1574)
Gonuile & Caius College1610Speed (p. 46, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1348" on label
Caius Colledge1610Speed (p. 45, inset listing places in city)
Gon. & Cai. Colleg.1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Gon. & Cai. Colleg. 1353)
dedicating the same to the honor of the Annunciation of the blessed Virgin Mary, naming it Gonuill Hall1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Gon. & Cai. Colleg. 1353)
by the former name of Gonuill [missing text]1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Gon. & Cai. Colleg. 1353)
who named it [missing text] and Caius Colledge1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Gon. & Cai. Colleg. 1353)

Gresham College (in London)

Gresham College was founded in 1581 by Sir Thomas Gresham as a free college in London for all who chose to attend.
http://www.gresham.ac.uk/text.asp?PageId=3

Greyfriars (in Oxfordshire)

Greyfriars was a Franciscan friary and hall of Oxford, founded in 1224. It was dissolved in the 16th century, when the Church of England was founded. "Grey Friars" was a colloquial name for Franciscan monks.
http://www.greyfriars.ox.ac.uk/gfo.html

Hearte Hall (in Oxfordshire)

In the 1280s, Elias de Hertford converted a building into a hall for students, known as Hert or Hart Hall. The name may be a shorter version of the founders' byname, or may have another origin. In 1874, it joined with Magdalen Hall to become the modern Hertford College.
http://www.akme.btinternet.co.uk/oclhert2.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hertford_College,_Oxford
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Hearte halle1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Hart Hall1622Scot (Oxford) (last entry on second page)

Huntingdon Grammar School (in Huntingdonshire)

Founded in 1565 as Huntingdon Grammar School, today it is known as Hinchingbrooke School.
http://www.hinchbk.cambs.sch.uk/school/school.htm#History
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
The free Shole [sic]1610Speed (p. 102, inset of "Huntingdon")

Iesus College (in Cambridgeshire)

Jesus College was founded in 1496 as "The College of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint John the Evangelist and the glorious Virgin Saint Radegund, near Cambridge." It was located on the site of the benedictine nunnery of St Mary and St. Radegund. Later, it acquired the name Jesus, from the name of the chapel in the nunnery.
http://www.jesus.cam.ac.uk/college/history.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
D. Donnes of Iesus Colledge1563John Foxe's Book of Martyrs
Jhesus Colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Iesus Colledge1610Speed (p. 46, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1502" on label
Iesus Colledge1610Speed (p. 45, inset listing places in city)
Iesvs Coll.1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Iesvs Coll. 1496)
to this his Colledge, dedicating the same to the hour of the blessed Virgin Marie, S. Iohn the Euangelist, and the glorious Virgin Rhadegund commonly called Iesus Colledge.1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Iesvs Coll. 1496)

Iesus College (in Oxfordshire)

Jesus College was founded in 1571 as 'Jesus College in the University of Oxford of Queen Elizabeth's Foundation'. It replaced the previous White Hall, which had existed since the 13th century. The name presumably reflects the dedication of the college, just as with saint's names.
http://www.jesus.ox.ac.uk/history/beginning.php
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Iesus Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Iesus Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, inset listing places in city)
27 Junis, Anno Regus sui 13. Collegium Iesus, infra Ciuitatem & Uniuersitatem Oxon. ex fundatione Regina Elizabethe1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Iesvs Coll. 1572)

Kinges College (in Cambridgeshire)

Kings College was founded in 1441 by Henry VI as "the King's College of Our Lady and St. Nicholas. From the earliest days, it was affiliated with Eton, a preparatory school founded at the same time. It has sometimes been known as the College of Saint Nicholas.
http://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/history/
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
the kynges Colledge1562Arthur Golding [?Queens' College], "A Briefe Treatise Concerning the Burnynge of Bucer and Phagius, at Cambrydge, in the Tyme of Quene Mary"
the kinges College1563John Foxe's Book of Martyrs
the Kynges colledge at Cambrydge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
the Kynges Colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Kinges Colledge1574Taylor (p. 106, map dated to 1574)
Kings Colledge1610Speed (p. 45, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1441" on label
Kinges Colledge1610Speed (p. 45, inset listing places in city)
Tho. Scot alias Rotheram, fellow of Kings Colledge1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Lincolne Coll. 1420)
Kings Coll.1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Kings Coll. 1441)
Kings Colledge1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Christs Coll. 1505)
Robert Woodlarke, borne at Wakerley in the Countie of Northumberland, third Prouost of the Kings Colledge of our blessed Ladie Marie the Virgin, and Saint Nicholas1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Katherine Hall 1475)

Kinges Hall (in Cambridgeshire)

King's Hall was endowed by Edward II in 1317 and chartered by Edward III in 1337. (Taylor, p. 93) It was combined with Michaelhouse to form Trinity College in 1546. It was also known as Soler Hall.
http://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/index.php?pageid=37
http://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/index.php?pageid=24#chaucer
http://www.goldbergweb.com/en/interpreters/orchestras/9577.php/A>
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
D. Blith of the kinges Hall1563John Foxe's Book of Martyrs
Kings Hall1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Trinitie Coll. 1546)

Kings Hall (in Oxfordshire)

A 1622 document says that this existed on the site of Brasenose College before its founding in 1515. The king (though we cannot know which one) was presumably the founder or a benefactor.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Kings Hall1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Brasen-Nose Coll. 1515)

The Kinges Schole (in Kent)

The King's School still exists today; its website claims a founding date of 597. Christopher Marlow was a student there.
http://www.kings-school.co.uk/library/memories/memories.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
The Kinges Schole1610?Speed (p. 106, inset map of city of Canterbury)
Note: this map is undated, but most maps in this source dated 1610

King Henry VIII College (in Oxfordshire)

In 1532, Cardinal College was refounded as King Henry VIII College. Thirteen years later, it was combined with the see of Oxford and reestablished as Christ Church College.
http://www.chch.ox.ac.uk/objects/downloads/christchurch_history.pdf

Lancaster Royal Grammar School (in Lancashire)

This school endowed by John Gardyner in 1472.
http://www.lrgs.org.uk/page?sp=254
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
The Free Schole1610Speed (p. 111, inset of "Lancaster")

Leaden Hall (in Westmorland)

Leaden Hall was probably so named because the building had a lead roof.
http://www.leadenhall.inty.net/school.htm
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Leaden Hallc. 1610Speed (p. 182, map of city of Kendale)
Note: this map is undated, but most maps in this source dated 1610

Lincolne College (in Oxfordshire)

Lincoln College was founded by Richard Fleming, Bishop of Lincoln, in 1427.
http://www.lincoln.ox.ac.uk/admissions/postgraduate/introduction/
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Lincolne colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Lincolne Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1420" on label
Lincolne Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, inset listing places in city)
Lincolne Colledge1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Lincolne Coll. 1420)

Magdalen College (in Cambridgeshire)

This college, which had previously been known as Monks Hostel and as Buckingham College was renamed "the College of St Mary Magdalene" in 1542, by Thomas, Lord Audley. It is interesting that it was founded after the Reformation, when saint's names were rarely used to name colleges. However, it is likely that two factors were important: first, there was already a Magdalene College at Oxford, and second, the typical pronunciation (sounding like "maudlin") was a play on the patron's title "Audley."
http://www.magd.cam.ac.uk/college/past.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Magdalene colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Magdalen Colledge1574Taylor (p. 76, map dated to 1574)
Magdalene College1592Taylor (p. 97, map dated to 1592)
Magdalen Colledge1610Speed (p. 45, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1519" on label
Magdalen Colledge1610Speed (p. 45, inset listing places in city)
Magdalene Coll.1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Magdalene Coll. 1519)
to alter the former name, and call it S Marie Magdalene Colledge in the faire Vniuersitie of Cambridge1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Magdalene Coll. 1519)

Magdalen College (in Oxfordshire)

Magdalen College was founded originally as Magdalen Hall in 1448. It was named for its patron saint, Mary Magdalen.
http://www.magd.ox.ac.uk/history/intro.shtml
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Collegii beate Marie Magdalene Oxonie1517Inclosures (vol. I, p. 122 (Latin))
Mawdeleyn Collegh[sic] of Oxforth 1517Inclosures (vol. I, p. 254 (English))
Magdalene colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Magdalene colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Magdalen Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1459" on label
Magdalen Coll: [abbreviation]1605Speed (p. 147, map of city)
founded this Colledge (where S. Iohns Hospitall had formerly ben situated) dedicating the same to the honor of S. Marie Magdalene1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Magdalene Coll. 1459)

Magdalene Hall (Oxfordshire)

Magdalen Hall was originally founded as part of Magdalen College by William of Waynflete in the mid-15th century. The main grounds of Magdalen College were shortly moved, leaving the hall isolated. By the time of Henry VIII, it had become an independent institution. It struggled through the 18th century, and was eventually refounded together with Hearte Hall as the modern Hertford College
http://www.magd.ox.ac.uk/history/intro.shtml
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hertford_College,_Oxford
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Magdalene hall1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Magdalene Hall1622Scot (Oxford) (last entry on second page)

Margarets Hostle (Oxfordshire)

A 1622 document says that this existed on the site of Balliol College before its founding in 1262. This was probably dedicated to Saint Margaret.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Margarets Hostle1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Baliol Coll. 1262)

Mary Hall (Oxfordshire)

A 1622 document says that this existed on the site of Balliol College before its founding in 1262. The hall was presumably dedicated to the Virgin Mary.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Mary Hall1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Baliol Coll. 1262)

Merchant Taylors' School (in London)

The Merchant Taylors' school was founded by the Merchant Taylors' Company in 1561. Thus, it was named for a guild, a distinction which it shares with Corpus Christi in Cambridgeshire.
http://www.socsci.kun.nl/ped/whp/histeduc/clough/gben007.html
http://www.mtsn.org.uk/about/history/mtshist1.htm

Merton College (in Oxfordshire)

Merton College was founded in 1264 by Walter de Merton, Bishop of Rochester.
http://www.merton.ox.ac.uk/generalinfo/gen_info.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Mertyne college1482?Stonor (p. 400, document 312 (English), dated 1 May [1482?])
Marten colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Merton Colledge1605Speed (p. 146, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1274" on label
Merton Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, inset listing places in city)
Merton Colledge1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Merton Coll. 1274)

Michaell House (in Cambridgeshire)

Michaelhouse was founded in 1324 by Hervey de Standon; it was named after its patron, Saint Michael. It was combined with King's Hall to form Trinity College in 1546.
http://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/index.php?pageid=37
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
D. Philo M. of Michaell house1563John Foxe's Book of Martyrs
Michael House1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Trinitie Coll. 1546)

Monks Hostel (in Cambridgeshire)

In 1428 Abbot Lytlington of Crowland Abbey founded a habitation for Benedictine student-monks named "Monks Hostel." Sometime after 1472, the name was changed to Buckingham College .
http://www.magd.cam.ac.uk/college/past.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
In a place where the Priorie of S. Gyles had formerly been situated, it was after an Hostle or Hall inhabited by diuers Monkes of seuerall monasteries to reside and studie in, and therefore, of old, called Monkes Colledge1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Magdalene Coll. 1519)

New College (in Oxfordshire)

The college known today as New College was founded in 1379. It was officially founded as "the College of Saint Mary", but as Oriel College was also officially known as the College of Saint Mary, this college came to be known as "the new college of St Mary" and then simply "New College." Its founder was William of Wykeham, Bishop of Winchester, and in some documents, the college is identified as "Winchester College." There is a single reference to it as "Seynt Mary college of Wynton", but that is presumably a scribal error, as five other references in the same document use Wynchester.
http://www.new.ox.ac.uk/college/briefhistory.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Seynt Mary college of Wynton1466Stonor (p. 179, document 85 (Latin), dated 1466)
Wynchestr. college in Oxon.1466Stonor (p. 179, document 85 (Latin), dated 1466)
Wynchester. college in Oxon.1466Stonor (p. 179, document 85 (Latin), dated 1466)
seynt Mary college of Wynch.1466Stonor (p. 179, document 85 (Latin), dated 1466)
Seynt Mary college of Wynchester in Oxon.1466Stonor (p. 179, document 85 (Latin), dated 1466)
Seint Marie College of Wynchestre in Oxon.1466Stonor (p. 179, document 85 (Latin), dated 1466)
Newe colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
New colledge at Oxford1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
New colledge of Oxford1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
New Colledge1605Speed (p. 146, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1375" on label
New Inne now in the tenure of New Colledge heretofore called Turlokes Inne1622Scot (Oxford) (last entry on second page)
[...] founded this Colledge, dedicating the same to God the Father and the blessed Virgin Mary1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. New Colledge 1375)

New Inne (in Oxfordshire)

New Inn Hall is a later name for Bishop Trellick's Hall, a hall founded in the thirteenth century.
http://www.spc.ox.ac.uk/history/index.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Newe Inne1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
New Inne now in the tenure of New Colledge heretofore called Turlokes Inne1622Scot (Oxford) (last entry on second page)

Northampton School for Boys (in Northamptonshire)

This school was founded in 1541.
http://www.nsb.northants.sch.uk/
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Free Schole1610?Speed (p. p. 134, inset listing places in city of inset of "Northampton")
Note: this map is undated, but most maps in this source dated 1610

Orial College (in Oxfordshire)

In 1324 Adam de Brome, an official in the Royal Chancery, was given permission to create the 'House of Blessed Mary'; the house probably was not founded until 1326. when it was refounded. The official name of the College is "the House of Blessed Mary the Virgin in Oxford commonly called Oriel College." The name 'Oriel' was in use before 1400; it almost certainly came from a property called 'Le Oriole," a house on that site which had been there since the 12th century. The 'oriole' referred to was probably a balcony.
http://www.oriel.ox.ac.uk/library/name&arms.htm
http://www.oriel.ox.ac.uk/library/historyofcollege.htm
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Orryall College in Oxonia1517Inclosures (vol. I, p. 355 (Latin))
Orryall College in Oxonia1517Inclosures (vol. I, p. 361 (Latin))
Auriell colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Oriall Colledge1605Speed (p. 146, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1323" on label
Orial Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, inset listing places in city)
[...] dedicating [...] to the honor of the blessed Virgin Mary, calling it the House or Hall of S. Mary the Virgin (vulgo Oriall Colledge)1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Orial Col. 1337)

Peckwater Inne (in Oxfordshire)

A 1622 document says that this existed on the site of Christes Church College before its founding in 1515. This was presumably based on the surname of the owner or founder.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Peckwater Inne1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Christ Chvrch Coll.)

Pembroke College / Pembroke Hall (in Cambridgeshire)

Pembroke College was founded in 1347 by Mary de St Pol, Countess of Pembroke. Its legal name remains "the College or Hall of Valence Mary commonly called Pembroke College in the University of Cambridge," named for the foundress, whose husband was Amery de Valence.
http://www.pem.cam.ac.uk/about/history/index.html
http://www.pem.cam.ac.uk/development/campaign/Legacy%20wording.rtf
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Pembroke Colledge, or Pembroke halle1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Penbroke hall.1574Taylor (p. 96, map dated to 1574)
Pembroke Hall1592Taylor (p. 95, map dated to 1592)
the Colledge or Hall of Mary Valence commonly called Pembrook Hall in Cambridge1594
Pembroke Hall1610Speed (p. 45, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1343" on label
Pembrok Hall1610Speed (p. 45, inset listing places in city)
[...] and then chosen Master of Pembroke Hall in the Vniuersitie of Cambridge1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Corpvs Christi Coll. 1516
William Smith, borne at Farmeworth sometimes Fellow of Pembroke Hall in the Vniuersitie of Cambridge [...]1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Brasen-Nose Coll. 1515)
Pembroke Hall1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Pembroke Hall 1343)
the Colledge of Mary Valence, after called Pembroke Hall)1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Pembroke Hall 1343)
Robert Shorton Doctor of Diuinitie, Master of Saint Iohns Colledge, after Master of Pembroke Hall1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Katherine Hall 1475)

Pembroke College (in Oxfordshire)

Pembroke College replaced Broadgates Hall in 1624. It was named after William Herbert, the then University Chancellor and Earl of Pembroke.
http://www.pmb.ox.ac.uk/pembroke_college/history.html

Peterhouse (in Cambridgeshire)

Peterhouse is the oldest College in Cambridge, founded in 1284 by Hugo (or Hugh) De Balsham, Bishop of Ely. It is sometimes known as Saint Peters House.
http://www.pet.cam.ac.uk/welcome/
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Petyrhous in Cambriggafter 1440Paston (vol. 2, p. 49, document 38)
Peter Colledge, or Peter house1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Peterhowse1574Taylor (p. 76, map dated to 1574)
Peter Houwse backside & Walkes1592Taylor (p. 93, map dated to 1592)
St Peters House1610Speed (p. 45, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1280" on label
Peter house1610Speed (p. 45, inset listing places in city)
S. Peters Coll. or House1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. S. Peters Coll. or House 1280)

Phiswicke Hostle (in Cambridgeshire)

Phiswicke Hostle was founded sometime in the Middle Ages; it functioned as a residence associated with Gonuille. In 1546 it was taken over for the foundation of Trinity College.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Phiswicke Hostle founded by Physwicke an Esquier Bedle1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Trinitie Coll. 1546)

Queenes College (in Cambridgeshire)

First founded in 1448 by Margaret of Anjou and then, unusually, again in 1465 by Elizabeth Woodville, two queens of England. The formal name is "The Queen's College of St. Margaret and St. Bernard, commonly called Queens' College." Erasmus used the form "Collegium Reginae." ('College of the Queen').
http://www.quns.cam.ac.uk/Queens/Misc/apostrophe.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
D. Bullock. M. of quenes College1563John Foxe's Book of Martyrs
The Quenes Colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Queens Coll [abbreviation]1574Taylor (p. 76, map dated to 1574)
Queens college1592Taylor (p. 99, map dated to 1592)
Queenes Colledge1610Speed (p. 46, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1448" on label
Quenes Colledge1610Speed (p. 45, inset listing places in city)
Hugh Oldham Bishop of Excester, sometimes of Queenes Colledge in Cambridge1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Corpvs Christi Coll. 1516
Queenes Colledge1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Katherine Hall 1475)
Qveenes Coll.1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Qveenes Coll. 1448)
[...] this Colledge [...] dedicating the same to the honor of S.Margaret and S. Bernard1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Qveenes Coll. 1448)

Queenes College (in Oxfordshire)

The 'hall of the Queen's scholars at Oxford' was founded in 1341 by Robert de Eglesfield, a chaplain in the household of Queen Philippa, who named it in her honour.
http://www.queens.ox.ac.uk/queens/index.php?menuID=8
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
collegio Regine in Oxon.1466Stonor (p. 179, document 85 (Latin), dated 1466)
the Quenes college in Oxon.1466Stonor (p. 179, document 85 (Latin), dated 1466)
The Quenes colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Queenes Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1340" on label
Queenes Colledge1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Qveenes Coll. 1340)

Queens Hall (Oxfordshire)

A 1622 document says that this existed on the site of Balliol College before its founding in 1262. The queen (though we cannot know which one) was presumably the founder or a benefactor.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Queens Hall1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Baliol Coll. 1262)

Rose Hall (in Oxfordshire)

Rose Hall was founded in the thirteenth century, and was abandoned at some point. The origin of the name is not clear. It could be named for the building, either a former inn (sign of the Rose) or because the building was known for its roses. It could be derived from the name of the founder. However, there is little information about it because it was not long-lived, nor did it become part of another college quickly.
http://www.spc.ox.ac.uk/history/index.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Rose Hall1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Baliol Coll. 1262)

Royal Grammar School (in Northumberland)

 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Grammer Schole1610Speed (p. 139, inset of "New Castle")

Rugby School (in Warwickshire)

Rugby School was founded as a free grammar school for the boys of Rugby according to the terms of the will of Lawrence Sheriff in 1567. And, yes, rugby was supposedly invented there.
http://www.rugbyschool.net/history/first400years.htm

S[aint] Alborne Hall (in Oxdfordshire)

St. Alban's was probably founded in the fifteenth century; it was merged into Merton College in the nineteenth century.
http://www.cwru.edu/edocs/8/239.pdf
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Alborne halle1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
S. Albons Hall1622Scot (Oxford) (last entry on second page)

S[aint] Augustines Hostle (in Cambridgeshire)

Saint Augustines was founded at an unknown time and incorporated into Kings College by the 16th century. in the nineteenth century.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
[...] in or about the places where the Churches of S. Nicholas and S. Iohn Zacharie, S. Augustines Hostle, and Gods House had formerly beene situated.1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Kings Coll. 1441)

Saint Bernard's College (in Cambridgeshire)

Saint Bernard's Hostel was replaced by St. Bernard's College in 1446, and two years later Saint Bernard's College was replaced by Queen's College. http://www.quns.cam.ac.uk/Queens/Misc/chronology.html

Saint Bernard College (in Oxfordshire)

The College of St Bernard, established by Archbishop Chichele for Cistercian monks in 1437, was closed at the dissolution of the monasteries. St. Johns College, founded in 1555, used the buildings.
http://www.sjc.ox.ac.uk/otherinfo/tour/stgiles.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
another Colledge in Oxford, dedicating the same to S. Bernard1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. All Sovles Colledge 1437)
a Colledge dedicated to Saint Bernard1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Iesvs Coll. 1572)

Saint Bernard's Hostel (in Cambridgeshire)

Saint Bernard's Hostel was replaced by St. Bernard's College in 1446, and two years later Saint Bernard's College was replaced by Queen's College. http://www.quns.cam.ac.uk/Queens/Misc/chronology.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Andr. Ducket Rector of S. Botolphs in Cambridge, sometimes Principall of S. Hostle, and the first President of this College1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Qveenes Coll. 1448)

S[aint] Catherines Hall (in Cambridgeshire)

Saint Catharine's Hall (today College) was founded in 1473 by Robert Woodlark; it was named after its patron, Saint Catharine. It was sometimes known as Catharine Hall.
http://www.caths.cam.ac.uk/library/history.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
S. Katherins colledge, or Katherin halle1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
S. Catherines Hall1592Taylor (p. 99, map dated to 1592)
St Katherins Hall1610Speed (p. 45, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1475" on label
Katherine Hall1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Katherine Hall 1475)
dedicating the same to the honour of Saint Katherine the Virgin and Martyr1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Katherine Hall 1475)

S[aint] Edmund Hall (in Oxfordshire)

Saint Edmund Hall is named for St Edmund of Abingdon, Archbishop of Canterbury, who is said to have taught there around 1200. Medieval halls were not incorporated and so have no date of foundation. But the hall existed by early in the thirteenth century. The name Aula Sancti Edmundi first survives by chance in an Oseney rent role for 1317-18.
http://www.seh.ox.ac.uk/index.cfm?do=history
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Aula Sancti Edmundi1317-18Found in an Oseney rent role - cited at http://www.seh.ox.ac.uk/index.cfm?do=history
Edmonde halle1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Edmund Hall1622Scot (Oxford) (last entry on second page)

Saint Johns College (in Cambridgeshire)

St John's College was founded in 1511 by Lady Margaret Beaufort. It was founded on the site of a hospital of St. John, which had exited since the early thirteenth century.
http://www.joh.cam.ac.uk/General/
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
S. Johns1562Arthur Golding [?Queens' College], "A Briefe Treatise Concerning the Burnynge of Bucer and Phagius, at Cambrydge, in the Tyme of Quene Mary"
D. Metcalfe. M. of Saint Iohns1563John Foxe's Book of Martyrs
Bayne of S. Iohns, Bach. of Diui. & after Doc1563John Foxe's Book of Martyrs
S. Johns Colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
S. Johns Colledge at Cambrydge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
St Iohns Colledge1574Taylor (p. 106, map dated to 1574)
St Iohns Colledge1610Speed (p. 46, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1508" on label
Sainct Iohns Colledge1610Speed (p. 45, inset listing places in city)
S. Iohns Coll.1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. S. Iohns Coll. 1508)
a Colledge,by the ancient name of S. Iohn the Euangelist in the Iurie1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. S. Iohns Coll. 1508)
Robert Shorton Doctor of Diuinitie, Master of Saint Iohns Colledge, after Master of Pembroke Hall1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Katherine Hall 1475)

Sainte Johns College (in Oxfordshire)

Saint John's College was founded in 1555 by Sir Thomas White, a former Lord Mayor of London. It replaced the old college of St. Bernard, established by Archbishop Chichele for Cistercian monks in 1437 and closed at the dissolution of the monasteries.
http://www.sjc.ox.ac.uk/otherinfo/tour/stgiles.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
S. Johns colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Sainct Iohns Colledge1605Speed (p. 146, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1557" on label
Sainte Iohns Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, inset listing places in city)
founded this Colledge, dedicating the same to the Honour of Saint Iohn Baptist1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Iesvs Coll. 1572)

Saint Johns Schole (in Warwickshire)

The Church of the Hospital of St. John became in 1557 the site of a grammar school, known as Saint John's school.
http://www.historiccoventry.co.uk/tour/tour.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
S. Ioh. Schole1610?Speed (p. 179, inset map of city of "Coventree")
Note: this map is undated, but most maps in this source dated 1610

College of Saynt John Baptiste (never actually founded)

The two documents in Paston are two versions of the same document: a petition to the king for a grant of letters patent to establish this college. The college was never actually founded; the money ended up at Magdelen, Oxford.
http://www.r3.org/archives/ricardian_britain/magdalen/report.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
the college of Sen John Baptist of Castreafter 1440Paston (vol. 4, p. 110, document 569)
the college of Saynt John Baptiste of Castreafter 1440Paston (vol. 4, p. 111, document 569 II)

Hospitall of Saint Julian (in Oxfordshire)

A 1622 document says that this institution was donated to Queens College by Edward III (before 1377). This was presumably dedicated to Saint Julian, though it was also known as Gods House.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
the Hospitall of S. Iulian in Southampton, commonly called Gods House1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Qveenes Coll. 1340)

S[aint] Margar[et?] Hall (in Warwickshire)

From Speed. We were unable to confirm that this location still exists.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
S. Margar hall1610Speed (p. 179, map of city of Coventree)

Seynt Mary College (in Oxfordshire) see New College


Saint Mary College (in Warwickshire)

Saint Mary College was an institute of learning associated with Saint Mary's church in the same city. The college was endowed in 1123, and existed until 1544, when it was dissolved as part of the Reformation.
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=36521
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
S' DECANI ET CAPITVLI S . . . . . . MARIE DE WAREWIKE14th Ca 14th C Seal (Latin)
Collegii beate Marie in Warwico1517Inclosures (vol. II, p. 443 (Latin))

Saint Mary Hall (in Oxfordshire)

Saint Mary Hall began as a part of Oriel College However it was an independent institution by 1545.
http://www.oriel.ox.ac.uk/library/stmaryhall.htm
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
S. Marie halle1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
S. Marie Hall1622Scot (Oxford) (last entry on second page)

S[aint] Nicol[as?] Hall (in Warwickshire)

From Speed. We were unable to confirm that this location still exists.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
S. Nicol. hall1610Speed (p. 179, map of city of Coventree)

S[aint] Nicolas Hostle (in Cambridgeshire)

S. Nicholas Hostel is mentioned in a few sixteenth century documents (it was not a friary, but gained some Domincan properties in the mid-16th century). ['Friaries: Dominicans, Cambridge', A History of the County of Cambridge and the Isle of Ely: Volume 2 (1948), pp. 269-76.]
http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=40011
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
D. Palmes. M. of S. Nicholas Hostle1563John Foxe's Book of Martyrs

Saint Paul's School (in London)

Saint Paul's School was established by Dean Colet in 1509.
http://www.stpaulsschool.org.uk/page.aspx?id=8295

S[aint] Thomas Hostle (in Cambridgeshire)

It is not clear when Saint Thomas Hostle was founded, but it was acquired by Pembroke College in 1451 (according to A History of the University of Cambridge) .
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
S. Thomas Hostle1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Pembroke Hall 1343)

Sidney Sussex (in Cambridgeshire)

Founded in 1596 under the will of the Lady Frances Sidney, Countess of Sussex. It is sometimes known simply as Sidney.
http://www.socsci.kun.nl/ped/whp/histeduc/clough/gben007.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Sidney Svssex Coll.1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Sidney Svssex Coll. 1598)
by the name of the Colledge of the Lady Francis Sidney Sussex1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Sidney Svssex Coll. 1598)

Soler Hall (in Cambridgeshire)

Soler Hall was another name for King's Hall, chartered in 1337. It was combined with Michaelhouse to form Trinity College in 1546. It appeared in Canterbury Tales as Soler Halle. The origin and identity of Soler Hall in Chaucer is unclear. It probably refers to a feature of the builidng, an upper level or prominent room on the upper level (modern solar or sollar). Alternately, it may be an error for Scholer, according to Derek Brewer (Brewer, Derek S. "The Reeve's Tale and the King's Hall, Cambridge." 5 (1971): 311-17).
http://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/index.php?pageid=24#chaucer
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Soler Halle at Cantebreggec1386-1400Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343-1400), "The Reeve's Tale"

Sparrowes Hall (Oxfordshire)

A 1622 document says that this existed on the site of Balliol College before its founding in 1262. This was presumably based on the surname of the owner or founder.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Sparrowes Hall1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Baliol Coll. 1262)

Stapeldon Inne (in Oxfordshire)

During the early years of its existence, Exeter College was known as Stapeldon Hall. This is derived from the surname of the founder (as opposed to the later name, Exeter, which was derived from his title as Bishop of Exeter).
http://www.exeter.ox.ac.uk/about/A-IV-0-BriefHistory.htm
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
founded this Inne or Hall, by the name of Stapleton Inne1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Excester Coll. 1316)

Trinitie College (in Cambridgeshire)

Trinity College was founded by King Henry VIII in 1546, and was a Protestant institution. It combined two previous colleges: King's Hall and Michaelhouse.
http://www.trin.cam.ac.uk/index.php?pageid=37
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Trinitie colledge 1562Arthur Golding [?Queens' College], "A Briefe Treatise Concerning the Burnynge of Bucer and Phagius, at Cambrydge, in the Tyme of Quene Mary"
Trinitie Colledge founded by kinge Henrie the eight1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Trinitie colledge at Cambrydge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Trinitie Coll [abbreviation]1574Taylor (p. 106, map dated to 1574)
Trinitie Colledge1610Speed (p. 46, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1546" on label
Trinitye Colledge1610Speed (p. 45, inset listing places in city)
Trinitie Coll.1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Trinitie Coll. 1546)
one Colledge, by the name of the holy and vndiuided Trinity1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Trinitie Coll. 1546)
given to his Colledge of the holy and vndiuided Trinitie in Cambridge1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Sidney Svssex Coll. 1598)

Trinitie College (in Oxfordshire)

Trinity College was founded by Sir Thomas Pope, a devout Catholic, in 1555. It was presumably dedicated to the Trinity, and had Trinity Sunday as its feast day.
http://www.trinity.ox.ac.uk/college/history/
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Trinitie colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Trinitie Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1556" on label
Trinitie Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, inset listing places in city)
Trinitie1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Trinitie Coll. 1556)

Trinitie Hall (in Cambridgeshire)

Trinity Hall was founded by Bishop Bateman of Norwich in 1350; it is distinct from Trinity College. It was presumably dedicated to the Trinity, and had Trinity Sunday as its feastday.
http://www.trinhall.cam.ac.uk/about/history.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Trynyte hall in Cambrigge1435-1436Paston (vol. 2, p. 40, document 29)
One other Trinitie Colledge, or Trinitie halle1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Trinitie Hall1574Taylor (p. 106, map dated to 1574)
Trinity Hall1592Taylor (p. 94, map dated to 1592)
Trinitie Hall1610Speed (p. 45, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "1347" on label
Triniti Hall1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Triniti Hall 1353)
and made therof a Colledge or Hall for Students of the Law, dedicating the same to the honor of the holy and blessed Trinitie in the Citie of Norwich1622Scot (Cambridge) (s.n. Triniti Hall 1353)

Vniuersitie College (in Oxfordshire)

University College was founded by William of Durham, who died in 1249. This would make it the oldest university at Oxford. The first school at Cambridge was similarly called "the House of the University of Cambridge," though its name would later be changed to Clare Hall.
http://www.univ.ox.ac.uk/collegelife/history.html
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
universitate Oxoniec. 1380Stonor (p. 110, document 31 (Latin), dated c. 1380)
Universitatis Oxon.1466Stonor (p. 176, document 84 (Latin), dated 1466)
Thuniversitie colledge1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
Vniuersitie Colledge1605Speed (p. 146, label for coat of arms drawn on side of map)
Note: "872" on label
Vniuersities Colledge1605Speed (p. 147, inset listing places in city)
founded this Colledge by the name of the great Hall or Vniuersitie Colledge1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Vniversitie Col. 873)

Vniuersitie Schooles (in Oxfordshire)

 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Vniuersitie Schooles1605Speed (p. 147, inset listing places in city)

Well Hall (Oxfordshire)

A 1622 document says that this existed on the site of Balliol College before its founding in 1262. The building presumably had a well on the site; there are several historical manor houses with this name.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
VVell Hall1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Baliol Coll. 1262)

Westminster School (in London)

Westminster School was confirmed by Queen Elizabeth in 1560; a school had already existed at Westminster Abbey for centuries.
http://www.westminster.org.uk/study/history.asp
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Westminster colledge01 Jan 1555JOHN ELDER'S LETTER DESCRIBING THE ARRIVAL AND MARRIAGE OF KING PHILIP, HIS TRIUMPHAL ENTRY INTO LONDON, THE LEGATION OF CARDINAL POLE, &C.

White Hall (in Oxfordshire)

A 1622 document says that this existed on the site of Brasenose College before its founding in 1515. This name was probably based on the color of the building, but a surname origin cannot be dismissed.
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
White Hall1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Brasen-Nose Coll. 1515)

Whyte Hall (in Oxfordshire)

White Hall existed from the 13th century, and was replaced by Jesus College in 1571. The origin of the name is unclear, but probably refers literally to the pale color of the building (as in the placenames Whitechurch and Whitehall).
http://www.jesus.ox.ac.uk/history/beginning.php
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
Whyte halle1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
White Hall1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. Iesvs Coll. 1572)

Winchester College (in Hantshire)

Winchester College was founded in the fourteenth century by William of Wykeham, Bishop of Winchester.
http://www.winchestercollege.co.uk/NetCommunity/Page.aspx?&pid=193&srcid=178
 
Dated Form:Date:Source:
the skollers of Winchester Colledge01 Jan 1555JOHN ELDER'S LETTER DESCRIBING THE ARRIVAL AND MARRIAGE OF KING PHILIP, HIS TRIUMPHAL ENTRY INTO LONDON, THE LEGATION OF CARDINAL POLE, &C.
Wynchester1564An Apologie or answere in defence of the Churche of Englande
The Colledge1610?Speed (p. 86, inset listing places in city of "Winchester")
Note: this map is undated, but most maps in this source dated 1610
He also founded a Colledge at Wincester1622Scot (Oxford) (s.n. New Colledge 1375)


Medieval Scotland | Medieval Names Archive | Names of English Colleges


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